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State of Alaska

Public Health Data Resources

How to find Data and Information on this Site

Each "Topic" site menu navigation item has a page that contains information for each topic. Along with this information are links to Data Resource pages, associated Indicator Reports and Dataset Queries. The Indicator Reports provide graphs, maps, public health context, and data tables. Some of the topic areas have queryable datasets that you can use to create your own tables, charts, and maps. These data query results pages will also have dataset details, including data sources and tips on how data can or cannot be used.

Alaska Public Health Data Sources

  1. Alaska Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)
  2. Alaska Cancer Registry (ACR)
  3. Alaska Childhood Understanding Behaviors Survey (CUBS)
  4. Alaska Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
  5. Alaska Firearm Injury Reporting Surveillance System (AKFIRSS)
  6. Alaska Lead Surveillance Program (LSP)
  7. Alaska Occupational Disease and Injury Surveillance System (AKODISS)
  8. Alaska Population Estimates Program
  9. Alaska Population Projections Program
  10. Alaska Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS)
  11. Alaska Trauma Registry (ATR)
  12. Alaska Violent Death Reporting System (AKVDRS)
  13. Alaska Vital Records (AVR)
  14. Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS)
  15. Health Facilities Data Reporting (HFDR)
  16. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH)
  17. Student Weight Status Surveillance System (SWSSS)
  18. Syndromic Surveillance

Data source not listed?

The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) provides information on a large number of data resources.

Template for Public Health Data Sources for Alaska

The Data Resources pages provide at a minimum a description of the data source along with contact information and web resources, when they exist. Completed data descriptions provide some, if not all, of the following pieces of information to describe the source.
  1. Name and abbreviation of Data Source.
  2. Sponsor - documents the agency or funding source for the data collection.
  3. Description - provides a summary description of the purpose of the data collection and the general content of the data set.
  4. Data Type(s) - indicates whether the data sources is a survey, registry, or program reporting database.
  5. Relevant Policy Issues - draws from the list of policy issues in Policy Issue Areas Guiding Inclusion of Data Sets (below).
  6. Unit of Analysis - describes the level(s) at which the data were collected (e.g., individuals, families, households, farms). (This information can help users determine the type of analysis that can be conducted and the research questions that can be asked.)
  7. Indentification of race/ethnicity - provides detained information on how data about race and ethnicity were collected for this data soruce. Where possible, question or form field text is included.
  8. Population in Data Set - provides the unweighted count of the sample included in the data source. This information can be provided in as much detail as is appropriate.
  9. Subpopulations - provides information on subpopulations for which analysis is possible (e.g., disabled, tribal health region).
  10. Geographic Scope - indicates the level of geographic analysis possible (e.g., national, state, regional breakdowns).
  11. Date or Frequency - provides information on the date of data collection and how frequently, if relevant, the data collections are repeated.
  12. Aggregate - this section is included only where it is necessary or particularly relevant to consider combining data collections across years. For example, when the population or regional sample is extremely small in one year, it may be necessary to combine multiple years of data to obtain a sample size appropriate for statistical analysis. Or, when the data are collected in segments across several years, it may be desirable to aggegrate across the years to provide full population coverage.
  13. Data Collection Methodology - provides some detail on how the data are collected (e.g., telephone, paper questionnaire).
  14. Participation - documents whether participation in the data collection efforts was mandatory or optional, and may provide information on the use of incentives.
  15. Response Rate - documents the response rate or coverage of the data collection. Unweighted response rates are provided where possible as thses are the most directly interpretable. Where only weighted response weights are available, they are reported and, in most cases, briefly explained.
  16. Sampling Methodology - provides detail on how individuals, household, or other foci were selected to participate in the data collection. (This is usually only appropriate for surveys, and, rarely, program reporting databases.)
  17. Oversample of Population - addresses the degree to which individuals or regions were purposely selected in excess of what would occur randomly.
  18. Analysis - includes information important to conducting statistical analyses of the data; for example, information on the standard errors of any estimates, the effective sample size, design effects, and description of the power available to detect differences in the data.
  19. Authorization - describes the authorizing legislation for the data collection, where appropriate.
  20. Strengths - summarizes the key strengths of the data source.
  21. Limitations - summarizes the key limitations of the data source.
  22. Other - contains other important information provided by the submitter.
  23. Access Requirements and Use Restrictions - describes the steps and cost involved in accessing, if possible, the data set.
  24. Contact Information - typically provides a name, telephone number, address, and email for the office responsibe for the data collection. (However, in some cases only a name is provided, and in other cases, only an email or Internet link is provided).
  25. Reports of Interest - provides a non-exhaustive list of key reports related to the data soruce.
  26. Website - provides the website of the data source or the agency collecting the information.
  27. Query Module - provides link to the AK-IBIS query module, when one exists.

The data sources template is based upon Data on health and Well-Being of American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Other Native Americans prepared by Westat for the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Key Policy Issue Areas Guiding Inclusion of Data Sets


DEMOGRAPHIC AND ECONOMIC INDICATORS (e.g., age distribution, marital status, household composition)

HEALTH POLICY ISSUES

  1. Measurement of health status (e.g., self-reported health, disability rates, mortality/morbidity rates, trends over time)
  2. Disease-specific measurements (e.g., % with diabetes, TB, STDs, cancer)
  3. Key health disparities of priority interest (e.g., prenatal care/birth outcomes, cancer mortality, substance abuse, alcohol use, mental health, suicide)
  4. Factors contributing to measured health disparities (e.g., access to health care, utilization rates, insurance coverage, health care financing, socioeconomic factors, preventative measures (such as immunization rates))
  5. Identification of evidence-based practices and programs that address causes of health disparities, result in positive health outcomes, and are generalizable/replicable
  6. Role of traditional medicine in AI/AN/NA communities

WELL-BEING ISSUES

Economic Well-being

  1. Income status (e.g., household income/poverty status, per capita income)
  2. Unemployment rates
  3. Economic assistance program participation rates (e.g., Temporary Assistance for Needy Families/Tribal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, Food Stamps)
  4. Economic opportunity (e.g., number of businesses/jobs, work history)
  5. Measurement of economic/employment disparities between AI/AN/NA and general population
  6. Factors contributing to economic disparities (e.g., lack of child care arrangement, transportation barriers)
  7. Identification of evidence-based practices and programs that reduce economic disparities and are generalizable/replicable

Education Levels and Opportunities

  1. Educational attainment (e.g., last grade completed, literacy/numeracy skills)
  2. Educational opportunities (e.g., Head Start, special education programs, school financing)
  3. Factors contributing to educational disparities (e.g., parents' education level, average education in city/county, education spending per capita, and other socioeconomic factors)
  4. Identification of evidence-based practices and programs that produce positive educational outcomes and are generalizable/replicable

Family Well-being

  1. Measures of well-being for families/households (e.g., families with low income levels, homeless families, teen pregnancy/birthrates, household size and composition)
  2. Factors contributing to well-being disparities of families (e.g., socioeconomic factors, education levels of family adults, housing quality, public transportation availability)
  3. Identification of evidence-based practices and programs that improve family well-being and are generalizable/replicable

Child Well-being

  1. Measures of well-being for children (e.g., children in foster care, incarcerated children)
  2. Factors contributing to well-being disparities of children (household composition, martial status of parents, foster care placement)
  3. Identification of evidence-based practices and programs that improve child well-being and are generalizable/replicable

Elder Well-being

  1. Measures of well-being for elders (e.g., elders with low income levels, homeless elders, elder abuse)
  2. Factors contributing to well-being disparities of elders (e.g., socioeconomic factors, living arrangements, activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL/IADL), family members in proximity, services available/used (such as Meals on Wheels/elder transportation)
  3. Identification of evidence-based practices and programs that improve elder well-being and are generalizable/replicable

Housing Issues

  1. Housing quality (e.g., rooms per person, running water, electricity, heat, age of building)
  2. Type of housing
  3. Housing ownership
  4. Rental unit quality and cost
  5. Homelessness

Transportation Quality and Availability Issues

Justice System Issues

  1. Rates of involvement with justice system (e.g., arrest, conviction, probation, parole rates)
  2. Differences in resolution of arrest, by type of court system (e.g., federal, tribal, state, local)
  3. Lifetime probability of being a victim of a violent crime
  4. Lifetime probability of being a victim of a non-violent crime
  5. Domestic violence rates
  6. Child maltreatment rates
  7. Factors contributing to disparities in involvement with justice system and outcomes (e.g., family stability/foster care placement, family members' history of legal system involvement, race/ethnicity, truancy history)
  8. Identification of evidence-based practices or programs that reduce involvement with justice system or reduce recidivism and are generalizable/replicable

Military Service/Veterans' Issues

  1. Military service rates (e.g., % served in military, % retired from military with benefits)
  2. Eligibility and use of Veterans Administration health facilities
  3. Eligibility and use of other Veterans Administration benefits (e.g., housing loans, educational benefits)
The information provided above is from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services' Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health (Ak-IBIS) web site (http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Fri, 21 July 2017 from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health web site: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov ".

Content updated: Wed, 24 May 2017 07:21:33 AKDT
The information provided above is from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services' Center for Health Data and Statistics AK-IBIS web site (http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Fri, 21 July 2017 16:53:00 from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Center for Health Data and Statistics, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/ ".

Content updated: Wed, 24 May 2017 07:21:33 AKDT