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State of Alaska

Health Indicator Report of Unintentional Injury Mortality Rate (HA2020 Leading Health Indicator: 16)

Alaska experiences one of the highest unintentional injury rates in the nation, ranking 8th among states in death rates.^1^ In 2014, unintentional injury was the 3rd leading cause of death for all Alaskans, with poisonings and motor vehicle accidents accounting for the highest number of unintentional injury deaths.^2^ Unintentional injuries disproportionately affect the younger population and are a leading cause of death among children and young adults and the leading cause of years of potential life lost in Alaska.[[br]] [[br]] ---- {{class .SmallerFont 1. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). National Center for Health Statistics. Accident Mortality by State: 2014. [http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/Accident.htm]. Updated January 19, 2016. Accessed October 4, 2016. 2. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). National Center for Health Statistics. National Vital Statistics System. Mortality, 2014. [https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/dvs/lcwk9_2014.pdf]. Accessed October 4, 2016. }}

Notes

Unintentional injury is defined by ICD-9 codes E800-E869, E880-E929 and ICD-10 codes V01-X59, Y85-Y86. Does not include legal intervention.   Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.

Data Sources

  • [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/VitalStats/Pages/default.aspx Alaska Health Analytics and Vital Records], Division of Public Health, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
  • National Center for Injury Prevention and Control's Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS)

Data Interpretation Issues

Alaska populations are from the [http://laborstats.alaska.gov/pop/popest.htm Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development, Research and Analysis].

Definition

Age-adjusted rate of unintentional injury deaths due to all causes per 100,000 population.

Numerator

Number of unintentional injury deaths in the resident population in the reporting period.

Denominator

Mid-year resident population for the same calendar year, adjusted to rate per 100,000.

Healthy People Objective: Reduce unintentional injury deaths

U.S. Target: 36.0 deaths per 100,000 population
State Target: Healthy Alaskans 2020 Target: 54.8 per 100,000 population

How Are We Doing?

In 2015, all Alaskans had an unintentional injury mortality rate of 57.2 per 100,000, exceeding the Healthy Alaskans 2020 goal of 54.8 per 100,000. The rate for Alaska Native people was over 125% higher at 130.4 per 100,000. Unintentional injuries (including unintentional poisonings) are the third leading cause of death in Alaska. In 2015, unintentional injuries claimed the lives of 385 Alaskans. More Alaskans died due to motor vehicle injuries than any other type of unintentional injury; 53 males and 21 females.^3^ Among the leading causes of death in Alaska, unintentional injuries ranked first in total years of potential life lost with 11,151 years lost. On average, 29 years of life were lost prematurely for each unintentional injury death.^3^ Since 2006, the crude rate for unintentional injuries has increased 12.5 percent. During this same time period, the age-adjusted rate has increased 9.6%.^3^ The northern region (Nome census area, North Slope Borough, and Northwest Arctic Borough) and southwest Alaska (Dillingham census area, Kusilvak census area, Lake and Peninsula Borough, Yukon-Koyukuk census area) exhibited high rates of unintentional injury mortality.[[br]][[br]] ---- {{class .SmallerFont 3. Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Health Analytics and Vital Records Section. Alaska Vital Statistics 2015 Annual Report. [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/VitalStats/Documents/PDFs/VitalStatistics_Annualreport_2015.pdf]. Accessed February 7, 2017. }}

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

In 2014 (the most recent year for which detailed national data are available), unintentional injury was the 4th leading cause of death in the nation, accounting for 5.6% of all mortality and an age-adjusted rate of 40.5 per 100,000. In contrast, unintentional injury was the 3rd leading cause of death in Alaska, accounting for 9.2% of all mortality and an age-adjusted rate of 54.5 per 100,000.^1^[[br]] [[br]] ---- {{class .SmallerFont 1. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). National Center for Health Statistics. Accident Mortality by State: 2014. [http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/Accident.htm]. Updated January 19, 2016. Accessed October 4, 2016. }}

Evidence-based Practices

As part of the Healthy Alaskans 2020 health improvement process, groups of Alaska subject matter experts met over a period of months in a rigorous review process to identify and prioritize strategies to address the 25 health priorities. Public health partners around the state are aligning work around these approaches adapted to Alaska's unique needs. '''Strategy 1:''' [[br]]Develop and implement a collaborative approach to reducing fatalities resulting from falls by older Alaskans. '''Evidence Base:''' [[br]]Preventing falls to older adults takes a multi-partner, multi-intervention approach. Success requires home-modification, physical activities, vision correction, review of all of medications and multifaceted interventions. While any activity engaged in on its own might show slight impact, overall success requires a collaborative, multi-pronged approach. '''Source:''' [[br]][http://www.cdc.gov/HomeandRecreationalSafety/Falls/index.html CDC: Falls - Older Adults] '''Strategy 2:''' [[br]]Form a task force to determine effective approaches to decreasing poisoning deaths and improve data collection. '''Evidence Base:''' [[br]]Unintentional poisoning deaths are increasing each year in Alaska and throughout the country. Promising practices for reducing prescription drug overdose deaths include implementing prescription drug monitoring programs, providing access to Naloxone, screening by physicians, and creating immunity laws. Other recommendations address childhood poisoning from household chemicals and carbon monoxide. However, there has not been a thorough multidisciplinary approach to poison prevention in Alaska, and there is insufficient information about the prescription drug poisoning problem in Alaska to assess how to address it. '''Sources:''' [[br]][http://www.ncsl.org/research/health/prevention-of-prescription-drug-overdose-andabuse.aspx Prevention of Prescription Drug Overdose and Abuse] [http://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/prescription-drug-abuse Office of National Drug Control Policy - Prescription Drug Abuse] [http://www.cdc.gov/homeandrecreationalsafety/Poisoning/laws/index.html Prescription Drug Overdose: State Laws] [http://www.cdc.gov/homeandrecreationalsafety/Poisoning/preventiontips.htm CDC Tips to Prevent Poisonings] '''Strategy 3:''' [[br]]Promote best practices for reducing transportation related deaths by improving data collection and promoting new and existing strategies. '''Evidence Base:''' [[br]]Multiple Alaskan strategic plans reference practices known to reduce some forms of transportation related deaths. However, there is less information about best practices for preventing deaths involving off highway vehicles, used both on and off roads. '''Sources:''' [[br]]Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities. [http://www.dot.alaska.gov/stwdplng/shsp/shsp_plan.shtml Strategic Highway Safety Plan] Alaska Traffic Records Coordinating Committee. [http://www.dot.state.ak.us/stwdplng/hwysafety/assets/pdf/2014/ATRCC_FFY15_TR_Strategic_Plan_FINAL_012414.pdf Alaska Traffic Records Strategic Plan]. 2014. A listing of strategies, actions, and key partners on this measure can be found at: [http://hss.state.ak.us/ha2020/assets/Actions-Partners_16_UnintentionalInjury.pdf].

Available Services

Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Section of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Injury Prevention [http://www.dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/InjuryPrevention/default.aspx] Alaska Injury Prevention Center (907) 929-3939 [http://alaskainjurypreventioncenter.org] Alaska Poison Control Center (for general information) 1-800-222-1222 (emergency hotline) Use Only As Directed [http://useonlyasdirected.org/] NATIONAL WEB SITES: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control [http://www.cdc.gov/injury/] National Highway Transportation Safety Administration [http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/] National SAFE KIDS Campaign [http://www.safekids.org/] Children's Safety Network [http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org/] U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission [http://www.cpsc.gov/]
Page Content Updated On 04/03/2018, Published on 04/03/2018
The information provided above is from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services' Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health (Ak-IBIS) web site (http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Mon, 21 May 2018 from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health web site: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov ".

Content updated: Tue, 3 Apr 2018 12:40:13 AKDT
The information provided above is from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services' Center for Health Data and Statistics AK-IBIS web site (http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Mon, 21 May 2018 18:17:13 from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Center for Health Data and Statistics, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/ ".

Content updated: Tue, 3 Apr 2018 12:40:13 AKDT