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State of Alaska

Health Indicator Report of Physical Activity - Adolescents (Grades 9-12) - Recommended Levels - 2008 Guidelines (HA2020 Leading Health Indicator: 6B)

According to the 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), 16.7% of all Alaska public traditional high school students were overweight and 14.0% were obese. Since diet and physical activity have been shown to help reduce weight and also to maintain weight, monitoring physical activity levels in adolescents is important. The recommendation based on the most current (as of Oct. 7, 2008) HHS Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (PAG) is: Children and adolescents should participate in one hour or more of physical activity per day; and most of the activity should be moderate or vigorous aerobic physical activity. They should participate in vigorous physical activity at least three days a week. They should participate in muscle-strengthening activities, such as push-ups and sit-ups and playing tug-of-war, three days a week. They should incorporate bone-strengthening activities, such as jumping rope, hopping or running, at least three days a week.^1^[[br]] [[br]] ---- {{class .SmallerFont 1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. [http://www.fitness.gov/be-active/physical-activity-guidelines-for-americans/]. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2008. }}

Notes

** Data Not Available

Data Sources

  • [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/yrbs/yrbs.aspx Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System], Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Section of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
  • [https://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/data/yrbs/index.htm Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS)], Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, CDC

Data Interpretation Issues

While the HHS Physical Activity Guidelines for youth recommend aerobic, muscle strengthening, and bone strengthening activities, the results presented are only for aerobic physical activity. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have identified the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) as a potential data source for muscle strengthening; however, the CDC has not released protocol for analyzing and reporting on this indicator as of April 22, 2016. Alaska has conducted a statewide Youth Risk Behavior Survey in 1995 and biennially from 2003. Weighted data were not obtained in 2005 and therefore no statewide estimates are available for that year. A YRBS survey conducted in 1999 did not include the Anchorage School District and therefore was not considered a valid statewide estimate. No YRBS survey was conducted in Alaska in 1997 and 2001. Traditional high schools are sometimes called comprehensive high schools. They are public high schools that are distinct from alternative high schools, which serve students at risk of not graduating, charter schools, correspondence schools, and students enrolled in high school in correctional facilities. Responses are weighted to reflect youth attending public traditional high schools in Alaska. The question on being physically active for 60 or more minutes every day during the past 7 days has been asked since 2007.

Definition

Percentage of adolescents (grades 9-12) who responded who responded "7 days" on the [http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/data/yrbs/index.htm Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS)] to the question: "During the past 7 days, on how many days were you physically active for a total of at least 60 minutes per day? (Add up all the time you spend in any kind of physical activity that increases your heart rate and makes you breathe hard some of the time.)"

Numerator

Weighted number of adolescents (grades 9-12) who responded "7 days" to the YRBS to the question: "During the past 7 days, on how many days were you physically active for a total of at least 60 minutes per day? (Add up all the time you spend in any kind of physical activity that increases your heart rate and makes you breathe hard some of the time.)"

Denominator

Weighted number of adolescents (grades 9-12) with valid responses on the YRBS to the physical activity question.

Healthy People Objective: Increase the proportion of adolescents who meet current Federal physical activity guidelines for aerobic physical activity

U.S. Target: 31.6% as measured by the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) for grades 9-12.
State Target: 23.0%

Other Objectives

Healthy Alaskans 2020 Leading Health Indicator 6.b: Increase the percentage of adolescents (high school students in grades 9-12) who meet the 2008 U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services Physical Activity Guidelines (at least 60 minutes of physical activity a day, every day of the week) to 23% by 2020. Related objectives: Healthy People Objective PA-3.2: (Developmental) Increase the proportion of adolescents who meet current Federal physical activity guidelines for muscle-strengthening activity U.S. Target: Not Currently Set as measured by the YRBSS for grades 9-12 Healthy People Objective PA-3.3: (Developmental) Increase the proportion of adolescents who meet current Federal physical activity guidelines for aerobic physical activity and muscle-strengthening activity U.S. Target: Not Currently Met as measured by the YRBSS for grades 9-12

How Are We Doing?

The prevalence of Alaska adolescents (grades 9-12) engaging in 60 minutes of physical activity every day of the week was 20.9% for all Alaska adolescents and 21.2% for Alaska Native adolescents in 2015. Male adolescents have significantly higher rates of meeting the physical activity recommendations than females. Male adolescents already exceed the Healthy Alaskans 2020 goal of 23.0% but were only 24.7% in 2015, continuing a downward trend from 28.0% in 2011. Prevalence rates of meeting aerobic physical activity guidelines of 60 minutes of physical activity every day from the YRBS are initially presented all Alaska adolescents, Alaska Native adolescents, and the mean of the national YRBS. Rates of participating in the second aspect of physical activity recommendations of 3 or more days of muscle-strengthening exercises are presented for all Alaska adolescents, Alaska Native adolescents, and the mean of the national YRBS. Rates for meeting the combined aerobic exercise and muscle-strengthening exercise are shown for all Alaska adolescents and Alaska Native adolescents. Subsequent analyses display aerobic physical activity rates by demographic subpopulations (i.e., sex, age, race/ethnicity, ethnicity, grade level, and academic achievement) and regions.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

In 2015, U.S. adolescents (grades 9-12) had a rate of 27.1% of engaging for an hour or more of physical activity every day (aerobic activity recommendation), which was higher than the 20.9% for all Alaska adolescents and the 21.2% for Alaska Native adolescents for the same period. The prevalence of muscle-strengthening activities on at least 3 days of the week in 2015 was 53.4% for the U.S. adolescents, 50.4% for all Alaska adolescents, and 46.5% for Alaska Native adolescents. The 2008 physical activity recommendation for combined aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities were met by 20.5% of U.S. adolescents, 17.4% of all Alaska adolescents, and 16.7% of Alaska Native adolescents.

What Is Being Done?

In fall 2011, the Obesity Prevention and Control Program began a new partnership with [http://healthyfuturesak.org/ Healthy Futures ].^2^ The program encourages kids to build the habit of daily physical activity through three main efforts: Running the Healthy Futures Physical Activity Challenge through Alaska elementary schools. Supporting community physical activity events by making them fun and affordable for families. Working with positive, physically active Alaska role models, including Olympic skiers Kikkan Randall, Holly Brooks, Lars Flora and nationally recognized athletes like NHL star Scott Gomez.[[br]] [[br]] ---- {{class .SmallerFont 2. Alaska Department of Health and Social Services. Division of Public Health. Section of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Obesity Prevention and Control Program website.[http://www.dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/Obesity/promotion.aspx]. }}

Evidence-based Practices

As part of the Healthy Alaskans 2020 health improvement process, groups of Alaska subject matter experts met over a period of months in a rigorous review process to identify and prioritize strategies to address the 25 health priorities. Public health partners around the state are aligning work around these approaches adapted to Alaska's unique needs. '''Strategy 1:''' [[br]]Implement a comprehensive social marketing campaign promoting physical activity. Choose campaign topics strategically. '''Evidence Base:''' [[br]]Citing the Community Guide and other reviews, the CDC recommends community-wide campaigns as effective in increasing physical activity. '''Sources:''' [[br]]Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Increasing physical activity: A report on recommendations of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services. MMWR. 2001; 50(RR-18): 1-16. The Community Guide: [http://www.thecommunityguide.org/pa/index/html] Kahn EB, Ramsey LT, Brownson RC, et al. The effectiveness of interventions to increase physical activity: a systematic review. Am J Prev Med. 2002; 22(4S): 73-107. '''Strategy 2:''' [[br]]Adopt and implement new school physical activity and Nutrition policies, also known as "wellness policies". '''Evidence Base:''' [[br]]Many of the evidence-based strategies to address childhood obesity (such as promoting quality PE and health education, and establishing a Safe Routes to School program) depend on the support of schools, communities, and parents to implement. Therefore a strategy recommended by the CDC, US DHHS and the IOM is to support the adoption and implementation of school physical activity and nutrition policies (also known as "wellness policies") by school districts. '''Sources:''' [[br]]CDC School Health Guidelines: [http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/npao/strategies.htm] Institute of Medicine. Progress in preventing childhood obesity: How do we measure up? Koplan JP, Liverman CT, Kraak VI, Wisham, SL editors. Washington: National Academies Press; 2007. US Department of Health and Human Services. The Surgeon General's Vision for a Healthy and Fit Nation. Rockville, MD: US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Surgeon General, January 2010. USDA Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 SEC. 204 Local School Wellness Policy Implementation: [http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-111publ296/pdf/PLAW-111publ296.pdf] A listing of strategies, actions, and key partners on this measure can be found at: [http://hss.state.ak.us/ha2020/assets/Actions-Partners_6_Physical_Activity.pdf].
Page Content Updated On 05/11/2017, Published on 06/20/2018
The information provided above is from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services' Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health (Ak-IBIS) web site (http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Sun, 15 July 2018 from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health web site: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov ".

Content updated: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 09:45:23 AKDT
The information provided above is from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services' Center for Health Data and Statistics AK-IBIS web site (http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Sun, 15 July 2018 13:03:18 from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Center for Health Data and Statistics, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/ ".

Content updated: Wed, 20 Jun 2018 09:45:23 AKDT