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State of Alaska

Health Indicator Report of Physical Activity - Adults (18+) - Recommended Levels - 2008 Guidelines (HA2020 Leading Health Indicator: 6A)

Regular physical activity can improve the health and quality of life of Alaskans of all ages, regardless of the presence of a chronic disease or disability. Adults benefit from moderate physical activity, of at least 150 minutes each week.^1^ Physical activity is recognized as an independent protective factor against cardiovascular disease, and has been shown to reduce the risk of some cancers, type 2 diabetes, stroke, and heart disease; and improve general physical and mental health.^1^ Weight-bearing activity can improve bone density, reducing the risk of hip fractures in elderly persons. Regular activity helps to relieve pain from osteoarthritis. Regular physical activity is also known to improve affective disorders such as depression and anxiety, and increase quality of life and independent living among the elderly.^2^[[br]] [[br]] ---- {{class .SmallerFont 1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee Report, 2008. [https://health.gov/paguidelines/report/]. Published 2008. Accessed October 14, 2016. 2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. [http://health.gov/paguidelines/guidelines/]. Published 2008. Accessed August 30, 2016. }}

Notes

U.S. values are based upon the median value of the states, District of Columbia, and territories. Alaska Native people in analyses of the BRFSS refers to any mention of American Indian or Alaska Native heritage when enumerating racial and ethnic background. Individuals who indicate multiple races including American Indian/Alaska Native are considered Alaska Native in the data. When race and ethnicity are consider concurrently, Hispanic individuals with American Indian/Alaska Native heritage are combined into the Alaska Native (any mention) group and removed from the Hispanic class. This measure is relevant for measuring progress to Healthy People 2020 Objective PA-2.1: Increase the proportion of adults who engage in aerobic physical activity of at least moderate intensity for at least 150 minutes/week, or 75 minutes/week of vigorous intensity, or an equivalent combination with a national target of 47.9%.

Data Sources

  • Alaska Data: [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/brfss/default.aspx Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System], Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, DPH, Section of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
  • U.S. Data: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)

Data Interpretation Issues

The Physical Activity Rotating Core (PARC) is part of the BRFSS core asked in odd-numbered years to measure progress towards meeting 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans.^1^ The PARC consists of three components of (1) presence of leisure-time physical activity, (2) listing up to two aerobic activities along with their frequency and duration, and (3) the frequency of muscle-building activities. The first component of leisure-time physical activity is measured by the question: "During the past month, other than your regular job, did you participate in any physical activities or exercises such as running, calisthenics, golf, gardening, or walking for exercise?" The second component of aerobic activity questions is only asked of respondents who answered "Yes" to the leisure-time physical activity question. It consists of two sets of three questions with the first set being: "What type of physical activity or exercise did you spend the most time doing during the past month?"; "How many times per week or per month did you take part in this activity?"; and "And when you took part in this activity, for how many minutes or hours did you usually keep at it?" The second set of questions is: "What other type of physical activity gave you the next most exercise during the past month?"; "How many times per week or per month did you take part in this activity?"; and "And when you took part in this activity, for how many minutes or hours did you usually keep at it?" The third component of muscle-strengthening activities is measured by the question: "During the past month, how many times per week or per month did you do physical activities or exercises to STRENGTHEN your muscles? Do NOT count aerobic activities like walking, running, or bicycling. Count activities using your own body weight like yoga, sit-ups or push-ups and those using weight machines, free weights, or elastic bands." See '''Resources and References''' for references.

Definition

Percentage of adults 18 years of age and older who report on the [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/brfss/default.aspx Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)] doing at least 150 minutes (2 hours and 30 minutes) a week of moderate-intensity, or 75 minutes (1 hour and 15 minutes) a week of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity, or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic activity. Aerobic activity should be performed in episodes of at least 10 minutes, and preferably, it should be spread throughout the week.

Numerator

Weighted number of adults (18+) who report on the BRFSS engaging in 150 minutes or more total per week of moderate or vigorous exercise where each minute of vigorous exercise contributes two minutes to the total.

Denominator

Weighted number of adults (18+) responding to physical activity questions on the BRFSS, excluding those with missing, "Don't know/Not sure", or "Refused" responses.

Healthy People Objective: Increase the proportion of adults who engage in aerobic physical activity of at least moderate intensity for at least 150 minutes/week, or 75 minutes/week of vigorous intensity, or an equivalent combination

U.S. Target: 47.9% as measured by the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for adults 18 years of age and older.

Other Objectives

Healthy Alaskans 2020 Indicator 6.a: Increase the percentage of adults (age 18 years and older) who meet the 2008 U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services Physical Activity Guidelines (150 minutes or more total minutes per week of moderate or vigorous exercise) to 61% by 2020. Healthy People Objective PA-2.2: Increase the proportion of adults who engage in aerobic physical activity of at least moderate intensity for more than 300 minutes/week, or more than 150 minutes/week of vigorous intensity, or an equivalent combination. U.S. Target: 31.3% as measured by the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for adults 18 years of age and older. Healthy People Objective PA-2.3: Increase the proportion of adults who perform muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days of the week. U.S. Target: 24.1% as measured by the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for adults 18 years of age and older. Healthy People Objective PA-2.4: Increase the proportion of adults who meet the objectives for aerobic activity and muscle-strengthening activity. U.S. Target: 20.1% as measured by the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for adults 18 years of age and older.

How Are We Doing?

In 2017, the prevalence of getting the recommended equivalent amount of 150 minutes or more per week of moderate or vigorous physical activity was 57.5% for all Alaska adults and 49.7% for Alaska Native adults, both below the Healthy Alaskans 2020 goal of 61%. Prevalence of meeting physical activity recommendations has not changed significantly since 2011. However, most groups still maintained a percentage higher than the Healthy People 2020 target of 47.9% for this measure. The prevalence rates for the standard aerobic physical activity measure (i.e., 150+ minutes per week) from the BRFSS are initially presented for all Alaskans, Alaska Native people, and the median from states, District of Columbia, and territories for all available years. The aerobic physical activity measure of 300+ minutes per week for additional and more extensive health benefits is presented for all Alaskans and Alaska Native adults. Recommended levels of twice-weekly strength training and overall physical fitness (150+ minutes per week) in conjunction with the strength training are displayed for all Alaskans, Alaska Native adults, and the national median. Subsequent analyses of the 150+ minutes per week of physical activity recommendation are presented by demographic subpopulations (i.e., sex, age, race/ethnicity, ethnicity, marital status, education, employment status, income, and poverty status). Differences were observed by race group and region of the state. Prevalence of meeting recommendations increased along with education and income levels. Crosstabulations of meeting aerobic physical activity recommendations by body mass index (BMI), current smoking, sexual orientation, disability, and Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) score were conducted for the 3-year average of 2013-2015. Only the significant differences related to BMI, smoking, and disability are presented, but the other comparisons are available upon request. Regional displays of this aerobic physical activity recommendation are presented for the most recent time period allowing reporting for all Alaskans and Alaska Native people: 1) single-year for the 6 Alaska Public Health Regions, 2) two-year averages by the 7 Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistics Areas and rural remainder, 3) single-year for the 10 behavioral health assessment regions based upon aggregations of 20,000 population, 4) two-year averages for 29 boroughs and census areas, and 5) two-year averages for the 12 tribal health organization regions.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

When compared to the median of states on the BRFSS, Alaska adults display higher rates of physical activity. In 2015, 58.5% of Alaska adults met the recommended amount of 150+ minutes per week of aerobic physical activity compared to the national median value of 51.0%. For the measure of twice weekly muscle-strengthening activities, 33.1% of Alaska adults met the recommendation compared to the national median of 30.2%. Nearly one-quarter (23.9%) of Alaska adults met both the aerobic and muscle-strengthening recommendations compared to just one-fifth (20.3% in 2015) for the national median.

What Is Being Done?

The Play Every Day campaign delivers Alaska-specific messages focused on raising awareness about childhood obesity in Alaska and encouraging parents and families to prioritize daily physical activity and serving fewer sugary drinks to their families.^3^ Play Every Day uses community and school events, as well as media and other marketing resources, to create a sustained campaign aimed at increasing youth and family physical activity, promoting participation in the Healthy Futures Challenge and physical activity events, and reducing sugary drink consumption.[[br]] [[br]] ---- {{class .SmallerFont 3. Alaska Department of Health and Social Services. Play Every Day. [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/PlayEveryDay/pages/default.aspx] Accessed August 30, 2016. }}

Evidence-based Practices

As part of the Healthy Alaskans 2020 health improvement process, groups of Alaska subject matter experts met over a period of months in a rigorous review process to identify and prioritize strategies to address the 25 health priorities. Public health partners around the state are aligning work around these approaches adapted to Alaska's unique needs. '''Strategy 1:''' [[br]]Implement a comprehensive social marketing campaign promoting physical activity. Choose campaign topics strategically. '''Evidence Base:''' [[br]]Citing the Community Guide and other reviews, the CDC recommends community-wide campaigns as effective in increasing physical activity. '''Sources:''' [[br]]Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Increasing physical activity: A report on recommendations of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services. MMWR 2001;50(RR-18):1-16. The Community Guide: [http://www.thecommunityguide.org/pa/index/html] Kahn EB, Ramsey LT, Brownson RC, Heath GW, et al. The effectiveness of interventions to increase physical activity: a systematic review. Am J Prev Med 2002;22(4S):73-107. '''Strategy 2:''' [[br]]Adopt and implement new school physical activity and Nutrition policies, also known as "wellness policies". '''Evidence Base:''' [[br]]Many of the evidence-based strategies to address childhood obesity (such as promoting quality PE and health education, and establishing a Safe Routes to School program) depend on the support of schools, communities, and parents to implement. Therefore a strategy recommended by the CDC, US DHHS and the IOM is to support the adoption and implementation of school physical activity and nutrition policies (also known as "wellness policies") by school districts. '''Sources:''' [[br]]CDC School Health Guidelines. [http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/npao/strategies.htm]. Institute of Medicine. Progress in preventing childhood obesity: How do we measure up? Koplan JP, Liverman CT, Kraak VI, Wisham, SL editors. Washington: National Academies Press; 2007. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Surgeon General's Vision for a Healthy and Fit Nation. [http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/priorities/healthy-fit-nation/obesityvision2010.pdf]. Published 2010. Accessed August 30, 2016. USDA Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 SEC. 204 Local School Wellness Policy Implementation. [http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-111publ296/pdf/PLAW-111publ296.pdf] A listing of strategies, actions, and key partners on this measure can be found at: [http://hss.state.ak.us/ha2020/assets/Actions-Partners_6_Physical_Activity.pdf].
Page Content Updated On 10/01/2018, Published on 10/03/2018
The information provided above is from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services' Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health (Ak-IBIS) web site (http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Sun, 18 November 2018 from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health web site: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov ".

Content updated: Wed, 3 Oct 2018 15:07:18 AKDT
The information provided above is from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services' Center for Health Data and Statistics AK-IBIS web site (http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Sun, 18 November 2018 19:41:19 from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Center for Health Data and Statistics, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/ ".

Content updated: Wed, 3 Oct 2018 15:07:18 AKDT