Skip directly to searchSkip directly to the site navigationSkip directly to the page's main content
Skip directly to searchSkip directly to the site navigationSkip directly to this page's context menuSkip directly to the page's main content
State of Alaska

Health Indicator Report of Cancer - Lung Cancer Incidence

Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in men (after prostate cancer) and in women (after breast cancer) in the U.S. It is estimated that there will be 234,030 new cases of lung cancer and 154,050 deaths in the U.S. during 2018. Most people diagnosed with lung cancer are 65 and older; the average age at the time of diagnosis is about 70. The risk of men developing lung cancer is about 1 in 15; for women the risk is about 1 in 17. Because symptoms often do not appear until the disease is advanced, early detection of this cancer is difficult, and so survival is relatively low.^1^ Cigarette smoking is the most important risk factor for lung cancer, followed by cigar and pipe smoking. There are over 70 carcinogens in cigarette smoke. Smoking accounts for about 80% of lung cancer deaths. Inhaling secondhand smoke on a regular basis will increase a non-smoker's chance of developing lung cancer and is thought to cause about 5% of all lung cancer deaths. Other risk factors for lung cancer include: long-term exposure to radon, workplace exposure to asbestos fibers, exposure to diesel exhaust or outdoor air pollution, radiation therapy to the chest for a previous cancer, high levels of arsenic in drinking water, and a family history of lung cancer.^2^ Incidence rates tell us about the rate at which new cases of a condition occur. As such, the incidence rate of lung cancer is an important indicator of the burden of this type of cancer in Alaska, allowing us to monitor how this burden changes over time and also to compare this burden among sub-populations.[[br]] [[br]] ---- {{class .SmallerFont 1. [http://www.cancer.org/cancer/lungcancer-non-smallcell/detailedguide/non-small-cell-lung-cancer-key-statistics What are the key statistics about lung cancer?] [[br]] 2. [http://www.cancer.org/cancer/lungcancer-non-smallcell/detailedguide/non-small-cell-lung-cancer-risk-factors What are the risk factors for non-small cell lung cancer?] }}

Notes

Click on the icon to the lower right of the graph to display confidence intervals. [[br]] Rates are age-adjusted to 2000 U.S. standard population. [[br]] Numerator is the number of Alaska cases.

Data Sources

  • [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/Cancer/registry.aspx Alaska Cancer Registry], Health Analytics and Vital Records Section (HAVRS), Division of Public Health, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
  • North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR), CiNA analytic public use file, accessed via SEER*Stat software. Includes incidence data from CDC's National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) and NCI's SEER registries.

Data Interpretation Issues

Cancer cases do not include in situ. Mortality rates may vary from source to source. This may be due to using provisional data or using different population databases. The cancer mortality rates provided by the [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/chronic/pages/cancer/registry.aspx Alaska Cancer Registry] use population estimates provided by the [http://seer.cancer.gov/ Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER)] of the [http://www.cancer.gov/ National Cancer Institute]. In contrast, [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/VitalStats/Pages/data/default.aspx Alaska Vital Statistics] uses [http://live.laborstats.alaska.gov/pop/index.cfm population estimates] provided by the State Demographer in the [http://laborstats.alaska.gov/ Research and Analysis Section] of the [http://labor.alaska.gov/ Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development].

Definition

Rate of newly reported cases of lung cancer per 100,000 population.

Numerator

Number of newly reported cases of lung cancer for a specific time period.

Denominator

Mid-year resident population for a specific time period.

How Are We Doing?

Lung cancer is ranked #2 for the number of cancer incident cases in Alaska over the time period 2011-2015. Lung cancer incidence rates have declined over the decade in both Alaska and the U.S. In Alaska, lung cancer incidence rates for men are consistently higher than for women, and men are on average about 1.4 times more likely to develop the disease. In 2015, the lung cancer incidence rate for men was 62.3 per 100,000 males, compared to the rate for women of 45.9 per 100,000 females. Around the state for 1996-2015, the incidence of lung cancer ranged from a high of 128.1 per 100,000 population in North Slope Borough to a low of 32.2 per 100,000 population in Bristol Bay Borough, compared to the statewide rate of 68.9. There was one borough for which a rate was not calculated because it had less than 6 cases. By race for 1996-2015, Alaska Natives had a much higher incidence rate of lung cancer than any other race at 92.8 per 100,000 population, compared to 66.4 for Whites, 62.4 for Blacks, and 44.9 for Asians/Pacific Islanders.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

Alaska has had consistently higher rates of lung cancer than the U.S. until 2012, when Alaska rates became consistently lower. In 2015, Alaska's lung cancer incidence rate was 53.5 per 100,000 population compared with the U.S. rate of 58.6 for 2014.

Available Services

Since smoking is by far the leading risk factor for lung cancer, public health programs to reduce lung cancer focus on tobacco prevention and control. Alaska's statewide Tobacco Prevention and Control Program coordinates efforts to accomplish the following four goals: 1. Prevent youth from starting tobacco use [[br]]2. Protect the public from secondhand smoke [[br]]3. Promote cessation of tobacco use among youth and adults [[br]]4. Identify and eliminate tobacco related health disparities and achieve health equity A free service that assists smokers with quitting is Alaska's Tobacco Quit Line at 1-800-QUIT-NOW (784-8669) or online at [http://www.alaskaquitline.com]. When calling the Quit Line, each caller is provided individual assistance by a trained Quit Coach who offers the following: - An assessment of readiness to quit [[br]]- A customized quit plan [[br]]- Nicotine replacement therapy [[br]]- Motivation and problem solving advice [[br]]- Up-to-date information on cessation aids and referral services [[br]]- A free Tobacco Quit Guide with helpful "how to" guides and resources [[br]]- Skill building and problem-solving [[br]]- Relapse prevention The service also includes a component called Text2Quit, which helps participants stay engaged with their Quit Coach, use medications correctly, manage urges, and prevent relapse; all from their mobile phones. These text messages are personalized to a participant's Quit Plan and sent out over a 4-month period, allowing participants to see their data and track their progress. People enrolled in the program can also request Web Coach, an online program that supports and assists tobacco users throughout the quitting process. Web Coach participants can view and track their quit plan progress online. They can identify patterns and triggers by tracking when and where they smoke, and calculate how much they are currently spending on tobacco. Once a participant has quit, Web Coach has additional features to help them stay smoke free. It lets participants use a quit tracker to see how long they have been smoke free and how much money they have saved by not buying tobacco, communicate with other participants via discussion forums, and access blogs posted on a regular basis on quitting topics. To take advantage of this free service, call 1-800-QUIT-NOW (784-8669) or visit [http://www.alaskaquitline.com].
Page Content Updated On 05/30/2018, Published on 05/30/2018
The information provided above is from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services' Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health (Ak-IBIS) web site (http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Sun, 18 November 2018 from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health web site: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov ".

Content updated: Wed, 30 May 2018 15:48:23 AKDT
The information provided above is from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services' Center for Health Data and Statistics AK-IBIS web site (http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Sun, 18 November 2018 18:25:46 from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Center for Health Data and Statistics, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/ ".

Content updated: Wed, 30 May 2018 15:48:23 AKDT