Skip directly to searchSkip directly to the site navigationSkip directly to the page's main content
Skip directly to searchSkip directly to the site navigationSkip directly to this page's context menuSkip directly to the page's main content
State of Alaska

Health Indicator Report of Heart Disease Mortality Rate

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, killing 610,000 and accounting for 1 in 4 deaths. In the United States someone has a heart attack every 42 seconds. Each minute, someone in the United States dies from a heart disease-related event.^2^ Heart disease costs the United States about $207 billion each year.^1^ This total includes the cost of health care services, medications, and lost productivity. Heart disease is not a single disease, but rather multiple diseases with different causes, risks, and potential interventions. Heart diseases include coronary heart disease, rheumatic heart disease, ischemic heart disease, hypertension, pulmonary heart diseases, heart failure, heart valve disease, cardiomyopathy, and other heart conditions. The most common form of heart disease is coronary heart disease (CHD), also known as coronary artery disease. CHD is the largest contributor to death from heart disease. Because certain types of heart disease have a long latency period, years might pass before changes in behavior or clinical practice affect heart disease mortality. Certain types of heart disease (e.g., heart valve disease) are not amenable to primary prevention or screening, but most heart diseases can be affected by lifestyle behaviors and health status.^3^ Modifiable risk factors for CHD include behaviors (e.g., tobacco use, physical inactivity, and improper nutrition), health status (e.g., hypertension, hyperlipidemia, overweight, or diabetes), and policies (e.g., smoking policies in restaurants and worksites).^4^ Substantial differences in CHD death rates and preventive measures exist by race, age, sex, place of residence, and other demographic factors.^2^[[br]] [[br]] ---- {{class .SmallerFont 1. Mozaffarian D, Benjamin EJ, Go AS, Arnett, DK, et al. Heart disease and stroke statistics-2016 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation 2016;133:e38-e360. 2. Mozaffarian D, Benjamin EJ, Go AS, Arnett, DK, et al. Heart disease and stroke statistics-2015 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation 2015;131:e29-e322. 3. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Chronic Disease Indicators. [http://www.cdc.gov/cdi/]. Updated January 15, 2015. Accessed October 6, 2016. 4. Fryar CD, Chen T, Li X. Prevalence of uncontrolled risk factors for cardiovascular disease: United States, 1999-2010. NCHS Data Brief 2012;103:1-8. }}

Notes

Data are age adjusted to U.S. 2000 standard population. ICD-10 codes I00-I09, I11, I13, I20-I51.   ** = Data not available Alaska Native people refers to any mention of American Indian or Alaska Native heritage when enumerating racial and ethnic background. Individuals of multiple races incorporating American Indian/Alaska Native are moved into the Alaska Native group. When race and ethnicity are consider concurrently, Hispanic individuals with American Indian/Alaska Native heritage are combined into the Alaska Native (any mention) group and removed from the Hispanic class. The definition of the Alaska Native group is intended to conform to the eligibility requirements for access to Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium.

Data Sources

  • [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/VitalStats/Pages/default.aspx Alaska Health Analytics and Vital Records], Division of Public Health, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
  • National Vital Statistics System, National Center for Health Statistics, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Data Interpretation Issues

Alaska populations are from the [http://laborstats.alaska.gov/pop/popest.htm Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development, Research and Analysis].

Definition

Heart disease mortality rate is defined as the number of heart disease-related deaths (ICD-10 codes I00-I09, I11, I13, I20-I51) per 100,000 population (age-adjusted to 2000 standard United States (U.S.) population).

Numerator

Number of deaths due to heart disease in the resident population within a reporting period.

Denominator

Mid-year resident population for the same reporting period, expressed as a rate per 100,000.

Healthy People Objective: Reduce coronary heart disease deaths

U.S. Target: 100.8 deaths per 100,000 population

How Are We Doing?

Heart disease is the second leading cause of death in Alaska. In 2015, heart disease claimed the lives of 835 Alaskans. Among the leading causes of death in Alaska, heart disease ranked fourth in total years of potential life lost with 7,383 years lost. On average, 8.8 years of life were lost prematurely for each heart disease death.^5^ In Alaska, there has been a decline in heart disease mortality from 213.1 deaths per 100,000 people in 2000 to 149.4 deaths per 100,000 people in 2015. Males have a significantly high rate of heart disease mortality, being 183.4 per 100,000 for males relative to 106.8 per 100,000 for females in 2014. Heart disease mortality rate was highest in the Southwest (207.2 per 100,000) and Northern (196.1 per 100,000) regions and lowest in the Anchorage-Matanuska-Susitna area (131.5 per 100,000) in the 5-year period of 2010-2014. There is a growing disparity in heart disease mortality rates between Alaska Native and non-Native people. Alaska Native people had significantly higher rates of heart disease mortality (205.3 per 100,000) than white individuals (135.4) in Alaska in 2014.[[br]][[br]] ---- {{class .SmallerFont 5. Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Health Analytics and Vital Records Section. Alaska Vital Statistics 2015 Annual Report. [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/VitalStats/Documents/PDFs/VitalStatistics_Annualreport_2015.pdf]. Accessed February 7, 2017. }}

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

Deaths due to heart disease have been declining in the U.S. Alaska's 2014 age-adjusted heart disease death rate of 142.7 per 100,000 was lower than the U.S. rate of 167.0 per 100,000. In 2014, national rates of heart disease mortality were higher in males (206.5 per 100,000) than females (180.6 per 100,000).^6^ There were also major differences in rates per 100,000 of heart disease mortality across races in 2013: Whites - 209.6, Black - 164.8, Asian/Pacific Islanders - 71.4, and American Indian/Alaska Native - 70.4.^6^[[br]] [[br]] ---- {{class .SmallerFont 6. Xu J, Murphy SL, Kochanek KD, Bastian BA. Deaths: Final Data for 2013. National Vital Statistics Report 2016;64(2):1-119. }}
Page Content Updated On 04/17/2018, Published on 04/17/2018
The information provided above is from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services' Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health (Ak-IBIS) web site (http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Sat, 21 July 2018 from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health web site: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov ".

Content updated: Tue, 17 Apr 2018 12:54:56 AKDT
The information provided above is from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services' Center for Health Data and Statistics AK-IBIS web site (http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Sat, 21 July 2018 14:52:29 from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Center for Health Data and Statistics, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/ ".

Content updated: Tue, 17 Apr 2018 12:54:56 AKDT