Skip directly to searchSkip directly to the site navigationSkip directly to the page's main content
Skip directly to searchSkip directly to the site navigationSkip directly to this page's context menuSkip directly to the page's main content
State of Alaska

Health Indicator Report of Cancer Screening - Female Breast (Mammography) - Women (Ages 50-74)

Recent data for the United States suggest why screening for female breast cancer is important. In 2016, 22.4% of women 50-74 years of age had not had a mammogram within the previous 2 years. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. In 2016, female breast cancer caused approximately 41,500 deaths.^2^ Approximately 245,000 new cases of invasive female breast cancer are diagnosed annually.^2^ For women of all ages at average risk, screening was associated with a reduction in breast cancer mortality of approximately 20%.^3^ Women with higher education and income tend to exceed Healthy People 2020 goals. Adults without insurance have the lowest screening rates. Cancer screening rates are short of the goal. Because disproportionately more American Indian/Alaska Native women are younger at diagnosis for breast cancer, screening beginning at age 40 is recommended.^4^ [[br]] [[br]] ---- {{class .SmallerFont 2. U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group. U.S. Cancer Statistics Data Visualizations Tool, based on November 2018 submission data (1999-2016): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Cancer Institute; www.cdc.gov/cancer/dataviz, June 2019. Accessed September 3, 2019. 3. Myers ER, Moorman P, Gierisch JM, Havrilesky LJ, et al. Benefits and harms of breast cancer screening. JAMA 2015;314(15):1615-34. 4. Roubidoux MA. Breast cancer and screening in American Indian and Alaska Native women. J Cancer Educ 2012;27(1 Suppl):S66-72. }}

Notes

The BRFSS question on screening mammograms is currently asked in even years. In order to produce regional depictions of screening rates for women 50-74 years of age, it was necessary to combine years 2006 through 2014 in order to obtain an average of the 5 survey periods. Geographic descriptions of the behavioral health systems assessment reporting regions can be found at: [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/InfoCenter/Pages/ia/brfss/geo_bhs.aspx]. ** Data not available due to fewer than 50 respondents in the denominator.

Data Source

Alaska Data: [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/brfss/default.aspx Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System], Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, DPH, Section of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

Data Interpretation Issues

Since 2000, the breast cancer screening questions have only been administered in the BRFSS in even-numbered years. Data are presented based upon the current U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation that women aged 50-74 years of age have a mammogram every 2 years.^1^[[br]] [[br]] ---- {{class .SmallerFont 1. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Final recommendation statement: breast cancer: screening. [http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/RecommendationStatementFinal/breast-cancer-screening1]. Updated January 2016. Accessed April 12, 2016. }}

Definition

Percentage of females 50-74 years of age who reported having a mammogram in the last two years on the [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/brfss/default.aspx Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)].

Numerator

Weighted number of females 50-74 years of age who responded "Yes" on the BRFSS to the question: "A mammogram is an x-ray of each breast to look for breast cancer. Have you ever had a mammogram?" and then either "Within the past year (anytime less than 12 months ago)" or "Within the past 2 years (1 year but less than 2 year ago)" to the question: "How long has it been since you had your last mammogram?"

Denominator

Weighted number of females 50-74 years of age who responded to the BRFSS question on ever having a mammogram and, if so, provided the timing of the last mammogram, excluding those with missing, "Don't Know/Not sure", or "Refused" responses.

Healthy People Objective: Increase the proportion of women who receive a breast cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines

U.S. Target: 81.1 percent

How Are We Doing?

In 2018, rates for screening mammograms within the past two years for those females between 50 and 74 years of age were 73.0% for all Alaska women and 83.4% for Alaska Native women. Screening rates in Alaska have declined from being above 80% in the 2000 to 2002 period to the current rate of 73.0%. Female breast cancer screening rates from the BRFSS are initially presented for all Alaskans, Alaska Native people, and the median from states, District of Columbia, and territories for all available years. Subsequent analyses by demographic subpopulations (i.e., age, marital status, education, employment status, income, and Medicaid eligibility status) are available from 1991 and later. Crosstabulations by current smoking, sexual orientation, and Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) score were conducted for the 3-year average of 2014-2018. Breast cancer screening prevalence by regions of Alaska are presented for the 5-year average time period of 2010-2018 allowing reporting for all Alaskans and Alaska Native people: 1) 7 Alaska Public Health Regions, 2) 11 behavioral health assessment regions based upon aggregations of 20,000 population, and 3) 12 tribal health organization regions. Special tables on screening rates starting at age 40, recommended for Alaska Native women, are included for all Alaskans and Alaska Native women for the period of 1991-2018 and by tribal health organization regions.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

Alaska screening mammogram rates have been below the U.S. median of states since 2004. Declines in screening rates have been higher in Alaska than the U.S. as a whole since 2006.

What Is Being Done?

[http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/wcfh/Pages/ladiesfirst/default.aspx Ladies First] is dedicated to improving access to high-quality breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services for women who are underserved. Ladies First also works to increase public awareness through education about prevention, disease processes, and the importance of appropriate screening for early detection.

Evidence-based Practices

The [https://www.thecommunityguide.org/ Guide to Community Preventive Services] is a resource to help choose programs and policies to improve health and prevent disease in communities. The Community Guide for Cancer Screening recommends client reminders, small media, group education, reducing structural barriers, and reducing client out-of-pocket costs to increase cancer screening.^5^ [[br]] [[br]] ---- {{class .SmallerFont 5. The Community Guide: Cancer.[https://www.thecommunityguide.org/topic/cancer]. Accessed September 23, 2019. }}

Health Program Information

In collaboration with four Tribal National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program grantees, Department of Health and Social Services' Ladies First program is working to increase both public and provider awareness about breast and cervical cancer screening recommendations as well as access to services throughout the state. Ladies First is federally funded through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and can cover the cost of screening and diagnostic tests for low income women who are under or uninsured. For more information about eligibility of services visit the Ladies First website at: [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/wcfh/Pages/ladiesfirst/default.aspx].
Page Content Updated On 09/26/2019, Published on 09/26/2019
The information provided above is from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services' Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health (Ak-IBIS) web site (http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Mon, 09 December 2019 from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health web site: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov ".

Content updated: Mon, 30 Sep 2019 08:31:00 AKDT
The information provided above is from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services' Center for Health Data and Statistics AK-IBIS web site (http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Mon, 09 December 2019 9:42:40 from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Center for Health Data and Statistics, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/ ".

Content updated: Mon, 30 Sep 2019 08:31:00 AKDT