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State of Alaska

Health Indicator Report of Blood Cholesterol: Screening - Adults (M 35+/F 45+)

High blood cholesterol is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, which are leading causes of death in Alaska. Cholesterol is a fatty, waxy substance found in all cells. It is made by the body and is acquired from foods. Cholesterol is necessary for proper cell function, but too much may lead to adverse health outcomes. Blood transports cholesterol particles through the body by attaching to high-density lipoproteins (HDL) or low-density lipoproteins (LDL). Having healthy levels of both types of lipoproteins is important.^2^ Cholesterol screening is an important tool in determining a person's risk for cardiovascular disease. High blood cholesterol has no symptoms; therefore blood cholesterol screenings are a necessary preventive health care measure. The risks associated with high blood cholesterol can be reduced by screening and early treatment.^2^[[br]][[br]] ---- {{class .SmallerFont 2. High blood cholesterol levels: Medline Plus Medical Encyclopedia. [https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000403.htm]. Accessed March 7, 2017. }}

Notes

U.S. values are based upon the median value of the states, District of Columbia, and territories.

Data Sources

  • Alaska Data: [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/brfss/default.aspx Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System], Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, DPH, Section of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
  • U.S. Data: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)

Data Interpretation Issues

Data for this indicator report are from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), a telephone survey of adults 18 and over. The survey is conducted in all 50 states, D.C., and U.S. territories. Data from the Alaska Behavioral Risk Factor Survey are intended to represent non-institutionalized adults in households with telephones. Information on background and methodology of the BRFSS managed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) can be found at: [http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/]. The website for the Alaska BRFSS is: [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/brfss/default.aspx]. Due to changes in sampling and weighting methodology, 2011 is a new baseline for BRFSS, and comparisons with prior year data are inappropriate. The validity and reliability of this indicator may be low because patients may not be aware of the specific tests conducted in clinical settings on their blood samples. The cholesterol questions are included in the BRFSS on odd-numbered years, with the exception of also being asked in 1992 and 2006.^1^ [[br]][[br]] ---- {{class .SmallerFont 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Indicator Definitions - Cardiovascular Disease. [https://www.cdc.gov/cdi/definitions/cardiovascular-disease.html#CVD4_0]. Published 2015. Accessed December 28, 2016. }}

Definition

Percentage of adults (males aged 35 years and older or females aged 45 years and older) who responded "within the past 5 years" (includes "Within the past year" and "Within the past 2 years") on the [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/brfss/default.aspx Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)] to the question, "Blood cholesterol is a fatty substance in the blood. About how long has it been since you last had your blood cholesterol checked?"

Numerator

Weighted number of adults (M 35+ / F 45+) who responded "within the past 5 years" (includes "Within the past year" and "Within the past 2 years") on the BRFSS to the question on time since last cholesterol screening.

Denominator

Weighted number of adults (M 35+/ F 45+) who provided complete and valid responses to the BRFSS question, excluding those with missing, "Don't know/Not sure" or "Refused" responses.

Healthy People Objective: Increase the proportion of adults who have had their blood cholesterol checked within the preceding 5 years

U.S. Target: 82.1 percent

Other Objectives

Related Heart Disease and Stroke Recommendations: HDS-13 (Developmental) Increase the proportion of adults with elevated LDL cholesterol who have been advised by a health care provider regarding cholesterol-lowering management, including lifestyle changes and, if indicated, medication (advised regarding cholesterol-lowering ... diet, physical activity, weight control, and drug therapy) HDS-14 (Developmental) Increase the proportion of adults with elevated LDL cholesterol who adhere to the prescribed LDL-cholesterol lowering management lifestyle changes and, if indicated, medication (adhere to prescribed cholesterol-lowering ... diet, physical activity, weight control, and drug therapy)

How Are We Doing?

In 2015, approximately 84% of Alaska adults (M 35+/F 45+) have had their blood cholesterol checked by a health professional within the past five years. Males (79.8%) also have a significantly lower prevalence of cholesterol screenings compared to females (88.7%). Unemployed Alaskans (67.5%) are significantly less likely to have been screened than those having other work status (80.0% for employed, 91.2% for not in the workforce, and 91.9% for unable to work). Alaskans with household incomes below the poverty threshold (68.2%) are less likely to be screened than are those meeting 200% or more of the poverty threshold (87.2%). Cholesterol screening also increases with education level, from 69.6% for those with less than a high school education to 90.1% among college graduates.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

The Alaska cholesterol screening rate is consistently slightly higher, being 83.5% compared to the U.S. rate of 77.7% in 2015.

What Is Being Done?

Alaska's Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program (HDSP) provides staffing and support for the statewide coalition, Take Heart Alaska.^3^ Take Heart Alaska is a partnership of agencies, organizations, and individuals working to promote cardiovascular health, prevent cardiovascular disease and improve cardiovascular care. Additional information on current cardiovascular disease prevention efforts in Alaska is available at: [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/Cardiovascular/default.aspx] or [http://dhss.alaska.gov/sites/takeheart/pages/main.aspx].[[br]][[br]] ---- {{class .SmallerFont 3. Take Heart Alaska [http://www.takeheart.alaska.gov] Accessed March 2, 2017. }}

Evidence-based Practices

In June 2008, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) strongly recommends screening men aged 35 and older for lipid disorders as well as women aged 45 and older for lipid disorders if they are at increased risk for coronary heart disease.^4^ [https://www.thecommunityguide.org/findings/cardiovascular-disease-clinical-decision-support-systems-cdss Clinical Decision-Support Systems (CDSS)] CDSS are computer-based information systems designed to assist healthcare providers in implementing clinical guidelines at the point of care. CDSS use patient data to provide tailored patient assessments and evidence-based treatment recommendations for healthcare providers to consider. Patient information is entered manually or automatically through an electronic health record (EHR) system [http://www.thecommunityguide.org/cvd/ROPC.html Reducing Out-of-Pocket Costs for Cardiovascular Disease Preventive Services for Patients with High Blood Pressure and High Cholesterol] Reducing out-of-pocket costs (ROPC) for patients with high blood pressure and high cholesterol involves program and policy changes that make cardiovascular disease preventive services more affordable. These services include: * Medications * Behavioral counseling (e.g., nutrition counseling) * Behavioral support (e.g., community-based weight management programs, gym membership) Costs for these services can be reduced by providing new or expanded treatment coverage and lowering or eliminating patient out-of-pocket expenses (e.g., copayments, coinsurances, deductibles). ---- {{class .SmallerFont 4. Final Update Summary: Lipid Disorders in Adults (Cholesterol, Dyslipidemia) Screening US Preventive Services Task Force. [https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/UpdateSummaryFinal/lipid-disorders-in-adults-cholesterol-dyslipidemia-screening]. Accessed March 2, 2017. }}

Available Services

Services Available to the Public: The Million Hearts initiative is a national effort to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017. Million Hearts is an innovative alignment and coordination of clinical and community activities targeting leading causes of cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality, including high blood cholesterol. These and other community and clinical activities are important measures to combat the impact of high blood cholesterol nationally. [http://www.millionhearts.hhs.gov./] The American Heart Association offers tools and resources for managing cholesterol for patients and providers. [http://www.heart.org/] The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) has instituted the ABC campaign which promotes the screening for A1C (blood glucose or sugar), Blood Pressure, and Cholesterol as monitoring measures to help control diabetes and heart disease. [https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-communication-programs/Pages/default.aspx]

Health Program Information

In December 1998, the Alaska Division of Public Health developed a comprehensive plan to reduce heart disease and stroke (cardiovascular disease) in Alaska. The Take Heart Alaska Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Plan was developed in collaboration with the American Heart Association, Alaska Health Fair, and representatives from hospitals, tribal organizations, and governmental offices, and with help from experts in cardiology, wellness, nutrition, and physical activity. Starting in October 2001, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention began providing the State of Alaska with a grant to address cardiovascular health in the state.
Page Content Updated On 03/16/2017, Published on 03/16/2017
The information provided above is from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services' Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health (Ak-IBIS) web site (http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Sun, 15 July 2018 from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health web site: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov ".

Content updated: Tue, 18 Apr 2017 16:52:24 AKDT
The information provided above is from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services' Center for Health Data and Statistics AK-IBIS web site (http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Sun, 15 July 2018 13:02:41 from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Center for Health Data and Statistics, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/ ".

Content updated: Tue, 18 Apr 2017 16:52:24 AKDT