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State of Alaska

Complete Health Indicator Report of Sugary Drinks - Adolescents (Grades 9-12)

Definition

Percentage of adolescents (grades 9-12) responding 1 or more sugary drinks per day on the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS).

Numerator

Weighted number of adolescents (grades 9-12) responding 1 or more sugary drinks per day on the YRBS.

Denominator

Weighted number of adolescents (grades 9-12) providing complete and valid responses to the YRBS questions on sugary drinks, excluding those with missing, "Don't know/Not sure," and "Refused" responses to either question.

Data Interpretation Issues

The increasing trend of consumption of 1 or more sugary drinks per day seen by year may be artificially inflated by the increase in the number of questions asked about consumption of various sugary drinks over the survey years. When the term sugary drinks is used, it corresponds to an index derived from all the sugary drink questions on the YRBS for each year. In 2009, 2011 and 2013, an index of sugary drink consumption was derived from only two questions (one about non-diet "soda"; the other a general question about "sugar-sweetened drinks, not including soda"). In 2015, a third question was included to capture information on consumption of "sports drinks" and the general question on sugar-sweetened drinks was reworded to exclude sports drinks. In 2017, a fourth question was included in the sugary drinks index to capture energy drink consumption, and again the wording of the general sugar-sweetened drinks question was changed to exclude this type of drink. Research has shown that sugary drink intake was lower when measured using a 1-question verses a 4-question screener. A single screener question underestimates sugary drink consumption because respondents have difficulty recalling consumption of multiple food or beverage items when asked in one question.^1^ Therefore, the 2017 result based on 4 questions is both higher and a more accurate estimate of sugary drink intake than previous years due to the increased specificity of drink types, and not necessarily an actual change in the prevalence. The questions on sugary drink consumption for each year on the YRBS can be found under the heading "Alaska YRBS Questionnaires" at: [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/yrbs/yrbs.aspx]. Responses for all questions in all years were: (a) I did not drink this/these drinks during the past 7 days; (b) 1 to 3 times during the past 7 days; (c) 4 to 6 times during the past 7 days; (d) 1 time per day; (e) 2 times per day; (f) 3 times per day; or (g) 4 or more times per day.

Why Is This Important?

There is strong evidence that consuming sugary drinks is linked to obesity,^2^ type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and tooth decay.^3-7^ The American Heart Association has issued scientific statements describing the risk of added sugars and cardiovascular disease risk in adults and in children.^8,9^ In rural Alaska Native children, the severity of dental caries in primary and permanent teeth has been shown to increase with each reported soda consumed.^10^ Sugary drinks are the number one source of added sugar in American diets. Added sugars contribute an average of 16% of the total calories in American diets; 46% of those calories come from sugary drinks.^11^ Sugary drinks provide empty calories; they are high in calories but low in nutrients. The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that less than 10% of calories come from added sugar. These recommendations aim to promote health, prevent chronic disease, and help people reach and maintain a healthy weight.^12^ That 10% equates to less than 200 calories, 50 grams, or 12.5 teaspoons of added sugar for the reference diet of 2,000 calories. One regular 12 ounce can of soda contains 140 calories (or 40 grams or 10 teaspoons) of added sugar. This means that even one sugary drink a day puts most people near their limit of added sugar for the day, increasing their risk of certain diseases. Nationally, the U.S. mean adjusted intake of added sugars remains high. In 2011-2012, children and adults consumed 326 calories/day and 308 calories/day, respectively, of added sugars, or 14% and 17%, respectively, of total their energy. For both children and adults, there was a considerable increase in calories from added sugars from 1977 to 2003, followed by a substantial decline from 2003 to 2012. Nationally, there was no decline in the percentage of total energy intake from added sugars from 2003 to 2012.^12^

How Are We Doing?

In Alaska, sugary drink intake is used as a proxy measure to track added sugar consumption since it accounts for 47% of added sugar in the American diet.^11^ For good health, even one sugary drink a day is too much, but in 2017, half (50.0%) of Alaska adolescents (high school students grades 9-12) drank one or more sugary drinks each day. Those living in the Northern and Southwest public health regions were more likely to drink a sugary drink every day than those in other regions. There were no significant differences between adolescents who were overweight or obese compared to those with a healthy weight in percentages that reported drinking one or more sugary drinks each day.

What Is Being Done?

Alaska's Play Every Day public education campaign has resources and materials to help families make personal decisions about their family's sugary drink intake. See [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/PlayEveryDay/Pages/default.aspx Play Every Day]. Alaska's Healthy Drinks for Healthy Kids project provides resources to dental professionals to help their patients reduce sugary drink intake. See http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/Obesity/sugarydrinks and http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/Obesity/sugarydrinks/healthydrinks.


Related Indicators

Related Relevant Population Characteristics Indicators:


Related Risk Factors Indicators:


Related Health Status Outcomes Indicators:




Graphical Data Views

1. Percentage of adolescents (students in grades 9-12 in traditional high schools) who report drinking 1 or more sugary drinks each day, Alaska and Alaska Native adolescents, 2009-2017

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confidence limits

Alaska ComparisonsYearPercentage of adolescents (grades 9-12)Lower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 10
All Alaskans200948.6%45.8%51.4%6411,355
All Alaskans201144.9%41.3%48.6%5921,309
All Alaskans201342.0%38.2%45.9%5061,214
All Alaskans201546.4%41.8%51.0%6211,380
All Alaskans201750.0%46.0%54.1%6191,265
Alaska Native people200965.2%59.1%70.9%187298
Alaska Native people201160.1%53.6%66.2%177301
Alaska Native people201357.6%50.6%64.3%161278
Alaska Native people201563.5%54.1%71.9%209346
Alaska Native people201757.1%50.3%63.7%187335

Data Notes

The term sugary drinks corresponds with an index derived from the 2 questions in 2009, 2011 and 2013, from 3 questions in 2015 and 4 questions about various types of drinks in 2017. The increasing trend of consumption of 1 or more sugary drinks per day may be artificially inflated. The 2017 results, based on 4 questions, are a more accurate estimate of sugary drink intake than previous years due to increase specificity, and not necessarily an actual change in prevalence. See Data Interpretation Issues section for additional notes. Alaska Native adolescent refers to any mention of American Indian or Alaska Native when enumerating racial or ethnic background. Individuals of multiple races incorporating American Indian or Alaska Native are moved into the Alaska Native group. When race and ethnicity are considered concurrently, Hispanic individuals with American Indian or Alaska Native heritage are combined into the Alaska Native (any mention) group and removed from the Hispanic group.

Data Source

[http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/yrbs/yrbs.aspx Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System], Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Section of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion


2. Percentage of adolescents (students in grades 9-12 in traditional high schools) who report drinking 1 or more regular soda/pop each day, Alaska and Alaska Native adolescents, 2007-2017

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confidence limits

Alaska ComparisonsYearPercentage of adolescents (grades 9-12)Lower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 12
All Alaskans200721.8%19.0%24.8%2641,306
All Alaskans200920.1%17.7%22.8%2681,360
All Alaskans201117.6%15.0%20.5%2241,315
All Alaskans201315.8%13.2%18.7%1811,221
All Alaskans201518.8%16.2%21.7%2431,389
All Alaskans201714.7%12.2%17.7%1831,308
Alaska Native people200731.3%25.9%37.2%70252
Alaska Native people200931.4%26.0%37.4%90299
Alaska Native people201128.3%22.6%34.9%79302
Alaska Native people201321.8%16.5%28.1%58281
Alaska Native people201530.1%25.0%35.9%96350
Alaska Native people201718.3%13.5%24.2%60342

Data Notes

The term sugary drinks corresponds with an index derived from the 2 questions in 2009, 2011 and 2013, from 3 questions in 2015 and 4 questions about various types of drinks in 2017. The increasing trend of consumption of 1 or more sugary drinks per day may be artificially inflated. The 2017 results, based on 4 questions, are a more accurate estimate of sugary drink intake than previous years due to increase specificity, and not necessarily an actual change in prevalence. See Data Interpretation Issues section for additional notes. Alaska Native adolescent refers to any mention of American Indian or Alaska Native when enumerating racial or ethnic background. Individuals of multiple races incorporating American Indian or Alaska Native are moved into the Alaska Native group. When race and ethnicity are considered concurrently, Hispanic individuals with American Indian or Alaska Native heritage are combined into the Alaska Native (any mention) group and removed from the Hispanic group.

Data Source

[http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/yrbs/yrbs.aspx Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System], Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Section of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion


3. Percentage of adolescents (students in grades 9-12 in traditional high schools) who report drinking 1 or more sugary drinks, not including soda/pop, each day, Alaska and Alaska Native adolescents, 2009-2017

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confidence limits

Alaska ComparisonsYearPercentage of adolescents (grades 9-12)Lower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 10
All Alaskans200917.8%15.4%20.4%2351,358
All Alaskans201118.8%15.5%22.7%2401,311
All Alaskans201316.9%13.9%20.4%2031,215
All Alaskans201530.8%27.0%34.8%4091,391
All Alaskans201735.5%31.7%39.5%4401,283
Alaska Native people200928.0%21.8%35.2%79298
Alaska Native people201128.0%21.0%36.1%79302
Alaska Native people201324.0%17.0%32.9%70278
Alaska Native people201545.4%37.0%54.0%147349
Alaska Native people201742.9%36.5%49.6%139339

Data Notes

The term sugary drinks corresponds with an index derived from the 2 questions in 2009, 2011 and 2013, from 3 questions in 2015 and 4 questions about various types of drinks in 2017. The increasing trend of consumption of 1 or more sugary drinks per day may be artificially inflated. The 2017 results, based on 4 questions, are a more accurate estimate of sugary drink intake than previous years due to increase specificity, and not necessarily an actual change in prevalence. See Data Interpretation Issues section for additional notes. Alaska Native adolescent refers to any mention of American Indian or Alaska Native when enumerating racial or ethnic background. Individuals of multiple races incorporating American Indian or Alaska Native are moved into the Alaska Native group. When race and ethnicity are considered concurrently, Hispanic individuals with American Indian or Alaska Native heritage are combined into the Alaska Native (any mention) group and removed from the Hispanic group.

Data Source

[http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/yrbs/yrbs.aspx Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System], Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Section of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion


4. Percentage of adolescents (students in grades 9-12 in traditional high schools) who report drinking 1 or more sports drinks each day, Alaska and Alaska Native adolescents 2017

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confidence limits

Alaska ComparisonsYearPercentage of adolescents (grades 9-12)Lower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 4
All Alaskans201513.1%11.2%15.1%1701,396
All Alaskans201710.2%8.4%12.4%1221,300
Alaska Native people201520.2%16.2%24.9%66350
Alaska Native people201712.1%9.0%16.3%38343

Data Notes

In 2015, the CDC issued a question specifically about sports drinks. The state of Alaska adopted the CDC sports drink question to allow comparison nationally. The CDC question is: During the past 7 days, how many times did you drink a can, bottle or glass of a sports drinks, such as Gatorade or PowerAde? (Do not count low-calorie sports drinks such as Propel or G2)? Alaska Native adolescent refers to any mention of American Indian or Alaska Native when enumerating racial or ethnic background. Individuals of multiple races incorporating American Indian or Alaska Native are moved into the Alaska Native group. When race and ethnicity are considered concurrently, Hispanic individuals with American Indian or Alaska Native heritage are combined into the Alaska Native (any mention) group and removed from the Hispanic group.

Data Source

[http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/yrbs/yrbs.aspx Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System], Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Section of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion


5. Percentage of adolescents (students in grades 9-12 in traditional high schools) who report drinking 1 or more sugary drinks each day, by sex, 2009-2017

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confidence limits

HA: Males vs. FemalesYearPercentage of adolescents (grades 9-12)Lower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 15
Males200952.8%48.4%57.1%329633
Males201154.3%49.5%59.1%343634
Males201346.9%42.7%51.1%275584
Males201553.5%48.4%58.5%359682
Males201752.8%47.7%57.7%326629
Females200943.9%40.0%47.9%306713
Females201135.4%30.5%40.5%248670
Females201336.3%31.1%41.8%224622
Females201538.5%33.2%44.0%256691
Females201746.9%41.9%52.0%290632
Total200948.5%45.6%51.4%6351,346
Total201145.0%41.4%48.8%5911,304
Total201341.7%37.8%45.7%4991,206
Total201546.1%41.6%50.8%6151,373
Total201749.9%45.9%54.0%6161,261

Data Notes

The term sugary drinks corresponds with an index derived from the 2 questions in 2009, 2011 and 2013, from 3 questions in 2015 and 4 questions about various types of drinks in 2017. The increasing trend of consumption of 1 or more sugary drinks per day may be artificially inflated. The 2017 results, based on 4 questions, are a more accurate estimate of sugary drink intake than previous years due to increase specificity, and not necessarily an actual change in prevalence. See Data Interpretation Issues section for additional notes.

Data Source

[http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/yrbs/yrbs.aspx Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System], Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Section of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion


6. Percentage of adolescents (students in grades 9-12 in traditional high schools) who report drinking 1 or more sugary drinks each day, by race, 2009-2017

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confidence limits

HA: Race: White, AK Native, OtherYearPercentage of adolescents (grades 9-12)Lower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 15
White200942.3%37.5%47.3%254607
White201138.7%34.4%43.2%261651
White201333.1%28.3%38.2%197592
White201536.8%32.1%41.8%243661
White201747.8%42.6%53.0%259557
Alaska Native people200965.2%59.1%70.9%187298
Alaska Native people201160.1%53.5%66.3%177301
Alaska Native people201357.6%50.6%64.3%161278
Alaska Native people201563.5%54.1%71.9%209346
Alaska Native people201757.1%50.1%63.8%187335
Other races200941.7%36.9%46.8%145341
Other races201140.2%34.7%45.9%137321
Other races201342.2%35.7%49.1%129309
Other races201541.7%36.1%47.6%135317
Other races201745.1%38.6%51.8%154338

Data Notes

The term sugary drinks corresponds with an index derived from the 2 questions in 2009, 2011 and 2013, from 3 questions in 2015 and 4 questions about various types of drinks in 2017. The increasing trend of consumption of 1 or more sugary drinks per day may be artificially inflated. The 2017 results, based on 4 questions, are a more accurate estimate of sugary drink intake than previous years due to increase specificity, and not necessarily an actual change in prevalence. See Data Interpretation Issues section for additional notes. Alaska Native adolescent refers to any mention of American Indian or Alaska Native when enumerating racial or ethnic background. Individuals of multiple races incorporating American Indian or Alaska Native are moved into the Alaska Native group. When race and ethnicity are considered concurrently, Hispanic individuals with American Indian or Alaska Native heritage are combined into the Alaska Native (any mention) group and removed from the Hispanic group.

Data Source

[http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/yrbs/yrbs.aspx Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System], Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Section of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion


7. Percentage of adolescents (students in grades 9-12 in traditional high schools) who report drinking 1 or more sugary drinks each day, by ethnicity, 2009-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

HA: Ethnicity - Hispanic/LatinoYearPercentage of adolescents (grades 9-12)Lower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 10
Hispanic/Latino200947.6%37.4%58.0%63133
Hispanic/Latino201144.3%35.8%53.1%62141
Hispanic/Latino201341.8%34.0%50.0%52125
Hispanic/Latino201538.9%30.1%48.5%49128
Hispanic/Latino201749.1%40.8%57.5%70139
Not Hispanic/Latino200948.4%45.3%51.5%5641,203
Not Hispanic/Latino201145.0%41.1%49.0%5211,147
Not Hispanic/Latino201341.6%37.4%46.0%4411,067
Not Hispanic/Latino201546.8%41.8%51.8%5541,219
Not Hispanic/Latino201750.0%45.6%54.4%5331,098

Data Notes

Ethnicity is determined by a yes or no response to the question Are you Hispanic or Latino? The term sugary drinks corresponds with an index derived from the 2 questions in 2009, 2011 and 2013, from 3 questions in 2015 and 4 questions about various types of drinks in 2017. The increasing trend of consumption of 1 or more sugary drinks per day may be artificially inflated. The 2017 results, based on 4 questions, are a more accurate estimate of sugary drink intake than previous years due to increase specificity, and not necessarily an actual change in prevalence. See Data Interpretation Issues section for additional notes.

Data Source

[http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/yrbs/yrbs.aspx Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System], Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Section of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion


8. Percentage of adolescents (students in grades 9-12 in traditional high schools) who report drinking 1 or more sugary drinks each day, by grade level, 2009-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

HA: Grade LevelYearPercentage of adolescents (grades 9-12)Lower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 20
9th200946.2%40.5%52.1%173379
9th201147.9%41.6%54.3%195411
9th201342.0%35.2%49.1%140339
9th201548.4%39.1%57.8%153324
9th201746.5%40.5%52.7%188412
10th200950.9%45.6%56.1%164339
10th201147.2%39.5%55.0%158345
10th201344.8%38.2%51.7%139318
10th201545.4%39.2%51.8%180415
10th201750.4%44.3%56.4%171345
11th200948.1%41.3%55.0%171358
11th201145.4%39.5%51.5%143315
11th201337.7%30.7%45.3%109280
11th201545.7%40.1%51.5%158352
11th201753.6%46.5%60.5%155297
12th200947.9%41.0%54.9%112246
12th201138.8%31.5%46.5%94231
12th201343.5%34.8%52.6%112263
12th201545.4%35.8%55.3%122276
12th201749.6%40.8%58.4%99201

Data Notes

The term sugary drinks corresponds with an index derived from the 2 questions in 2009, 2011 and 2013, from 3 questions in 2015 and 4 questions about various types of drinks in 2017. The increasing trend of consumption of 1 or more sugary drinks per day may be artificially inflated. The 2017 results, based on 4 questions, are a more accurate estimate of sugary drink intake than previous years due to increase specificity, and not necessarily an actual change in prevalence. See Data Interpretation Issues section for additional notes.

Data Source

[http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/yrbs/yrbs.aspx Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System], Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Section of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion


9. Percentage of adolescents (students in grades 9-12 in traditional high schools) who report drinking 1 or more sugary drinks each day, by academic achievement, 2009-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

HA: Academic PerformanceYearPercentage of adolescents (grades 9-12)Lower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 10
Mostly As and Bs200943.2%39.7%46.9%376904
Mostly As and Bs201137.7%33.1%42.5%333867
Mostly As and Bs201336.6%32.3%41.2%315859
Mostly As and Bs201541.0%36.2%46.1%380948
Mostly As and Bs201745.6%40.6%50.7%384864
Not mostly As and Bs200959.0%53.8%64.1%262447
Not mostly As and Bs201159.4%52.7%65.7%255435
Not mostly As and Bs201354.3%49.4%59.1%184344
Not mostly As and Bs201557.4%51.2%63.4%234418
Not mostly As and Bs201760.0%54.3%65.4%221377

Data Notes

Students were asked: during the past 12 months, how would you describe your grades in school? Response options were: Mostly A's; Mostly B's; Mostly C's; Mostly D's; Mostly F's; None of these grades; or Not sure. The term sugary drinks corresponds with an index derived from the 2 questions in 2009, 2011 and 2013, from 3 questions in 2015 and 4 questions about various types of drinks in 2017. The increasing trend of consumption of 1 or more sugary drinks per day may be artificially inflated. The 2017 results, based on 4 questions, are a more accurate estimate of sugary drink intake than previous years due to increase specificity, and not necessarily an actual change in prevalence. See Data Interpretation Issues section for additional notes.

Data Source

[http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/yrbs/yrbs.aspx Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System], Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Section of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion


10. Percentage of adolescents (students in grades 9-12 in traditional high schools)who report drinking 1 or more sugary drinks each day, by weight status 2009-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

BMI: LT 25 (healthy), 25-30 (overweight), 30+ (obese)YearPercentage of adolescents (grades 9-12)Lower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 15
Neither Overweight nor Obese200948.6%45.2%52.0%459963
Neither Overweight nor Obese201143.1%39.2%47.0%401922
Neither Overweight nor Obese201340.7%36.5%45.2%339848
Neither Overweight nor Obese201544.4%38.9%50.1%392901
Neither Overweight nor Obese201747.7%43.0%52.4%388821
Overweight200947.3%41.2%53.6%88193
Overweight201150.4%41.0%59.7%92187
Overweight201344.8%35.7%54.2%73165
Overweight201551.6%43.3%59.9%107222
Overweight201749.3%42.2%56.5%104218
Obese200946.2%38.5%54.2%65150
Obese201151.0%42.2%59.7%76149
Obese201340.2%32.8%48.1%59139
Obese201548.2%40.8%55.8%88188
Obese201757.4%48.2%66.1%89164

Data Notes

Weight status was defined using the self-reported height in feet and inches rounded to the nearest whole number and weight in pounds rounded to the nearest whole number. Imperial numbers are converted into metric and Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated using weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters. Weight status is then classified using sex specific BMI Percentile growth charts. Underweight is less than the 5th percentile; normal or healthy weight is 5th percentile to less than the 85th percentile; overweight is 85th to less than the 95th percentile; and obese is equal to or greater than the 95th percentile. When the term sugary drinks is used, it corresponds with the derived score from the two questions in 2009, 2011 and 2013 or the derived score from the three questions in 2015.

Data Source

[http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/yrbs/yrbs.aspx Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System], Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Section of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion


11. Percentage of adolescents (students in grades 9-12 in traditional high schools) who report drinking 1 or more sugary drinks each day, by public health regions, 2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Alaska ComparisonsPercentage of adolescents (grades 9-12)Lower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 14
All AlaskansAnchorage45.9%42.9%48.9%6611,345
All AlaskansGulf Coast46.8%44.0%49.6%9221,953
All AlaskansInterior48.4%45.2%51.7%327676
All AlaskansMat-Su47.3%43.3%51.5%406791
All AlaskansNorthern63.4%59.7%66.9%423660
All AlaskansSoutheast46.0%41.7%50.4%4801,053
All AlaskansSouthwest64.2%61.3%67.0%538856
Alaska Native peopleAnchorage51.9%44.3%59.5%146259
Alaska Native peopleGulf Coast53.1%47.9%58.3%197372
Alaska Native peopleInterior53.1%48.9%57.3%109208
Alaska Native peopleMat-Su49.9%40.0%59.8%94172
Alaska Native peopleNorthern65.8%62.0%69.4%372556
Alaska Native peopleSoutheast49.8%43.5%56.0%126260
Alaska Native peopleSouthwest66.2%62.8%69.5%487751

Data Notes

These data are a regional compilation of YRBS surveys conducted for local school districts. They consist of both representative (weighted) and unrepresentative (unweighted) samples. The representative samples have been weighted to the sex and grade characteristics of their school district. The unrepresentative surveys have a weight of 1 to signify that the information is not extrapolated to other students. The results of the local YRBS program may not meet the statistical rigor of the statewide estimates and should be viewed with caution. However, the local YRBS program does demonstrate the existence of risk factors. The term sugary drinks corresponds with an index derived from the two questions in 2009, 2011 and 2013, from three questions in 2015 and 4 questions about various types of drinks in 2017. The 2017 results are a more accurate estimate of sugary drink intake than previous years due to increase specificity. See Data Interpretation issues section for additional notes.

Data Source

[http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/yrbs/yrbs.aspx Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System], Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Section of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion


12. Percentage of adolescents (students in grades 9-12 in traditional high schools) who report drinking 1 or more sugary drinks each day, by behavioral health systems regions 2015-2017

::chart - missing::
confidence limits

Alaska ComparisonsPercentage of adolescents (grades 9-12)Lower LimitUpper LimitNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 22
All AlaskansAnchorage Muncipality43.0%40.4%45.6%1,1682,530
All AlaskansFairbanks North Star Borough41.6%37.6%45.7%374866
All AlaskansCity and Borough of Juneau42.4%37.4%47.5%372876
All AlaskansKenai Peninsula Borough42.5%40.0%45.1%9872,308
All AlaskansMatanuska-Susitna Borough44.7%42.1%47.3%8851,867
All AlaskansNorthwest Region68.1%64.9%71.2%9411,392
All AlaskansOther Interior Region54.8%50.6%58.9%332618
All AlaskansOther SE - Northern39.6%34.7%44.7%285698
All AlaskansOther SE - Southern42.2%38.0%46.5%351825
All AlaskansY-K Delta Region65.7%62.6%68.6%592918
All AlaskansSouthwest Region45.9%43.0%48.9%445993
Alaska Native peopleAnchorage Muncipality43.2%37.2%49.4%240478
Alaska Native peopleFairbanks North Star Borough45.2%35.2%55.5%57131
Alaska Native peopleCity and Borough of Juneau45.5%39.3%51.8%72157
Alaska Native peopleKenai Peninsula Borough50.2%45.1%55.3%208413
Alaska Native peopleMatanuska-Susitna Borough47.8%42.0%53.7%215406
Alaska Native peopleNorthwest Region71.0%67.7%74.1%8271,162
Alaska Native peopleOther Interior Region62.0%57.0%66.8%195320
Alaska Native peopleOther SE - Northern51.5%41.6%61.4%87168
Alaska Native peopleOther SE - Southern46.8%40.3%53.4%114242
Alaska Native peopleY-K Delta Region66.6%63.2%69.8%546835
Alaska Native peopleSouthwest Region55.0%51.0%59.0%165306

Data Notes

These data are a regional compilation of YRBS surveys conducted for local school districts. They consist of both representative (weighted) and unrepresentative (unweighted) samples. The representative samples have been weighted to the sex and grade characteristics of their school district. The unrepresentative surveys have a weight of 1 to signify that the information is not extrapolated to other students. The results of the local YRBS program may not meet the statistical rigor of the statewide estimates and should be viewed with caution. However, the local YRBS program does demonstrate the existence of risk factors. The term sugary drinks corresponds with an index derived from the two questions in 2009, 2011 and 2013, from three questions in 2015 and 4 questions about various types of drinks in 2017. The 2017 results are a more accurate estimate of sugary drink intake than previous years due to increase specificity. See Data Interpretation issues section for additional notes.

Data Source

[http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Chronic/Pages/yrbs/yrbs.aspx Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System], Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Section of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

References and Community Resources

References: 1. Lundeen EA, Park S, Dooyema C, Black H. Total sugar-sweetened beverage intake among US adults was lower when measured using a 1-question verse 4-question screener. American Journal of Health Promotion. 2018;32(6):1431-1437. 2. Woodward-Lopez G, Kao J, Ritchie L. To what extent have sweetened beverages contributed to the obesity epidemic? Pub Health Nutr. 2011;14(3):499-509. 3. Vartanian LR, Schwartz MB, Brownell KD. Effects of soft drink consumption on nutrition and health: a systematic review and meta analysis. Am J Public Health. 2007;97(4):667-675. 4. de Koning L, Malik VS, Kellogg MD, Rimm EB, et al. Sweetened beverage consumption, incident coronary heart disease, and biomarkers of risk in men. Circulation. 2012;125(14):1735-1741. 5. Malik VS, Popkin BM, Bray GA, Despres JP, et al. Sugar-sweetened beverages and risk of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis. Diabetes Care. 2010;33(11):2477-2483. 6. Fung TT, Malik V, Rexrode KM, Manson JE, et al. Sweetened beverage consumption and risk of coronary heart disease in women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(4):1037-1042. 7. Sohn W, Burt BA, Sowers MR. Carbonated soft drinks and dental caries in the primary dentition. J Dent Res. 2006;85(3):262-266. 8. Johnson RK, Appel LJ, Brands M, Howard BV, et al. Dietary sugar intake and cardiovascular health: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2009;120(11):1011-1020. 9. Vox MB, Kaar JL, Welsh JA, Van Horn LV, et al. Added sugars and cardiovascular disease risk in children: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2017;135(19):1017-e1034. 10. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dental caries in rural Alaska Native children --- Alaska, 2008. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 2011;60(37):1275-1278. [http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6037a2.htm]. 11. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2015 to 2020 dietary guidelines for Americans. 8th Edition. [https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/]. Published December 2015. Accessed May 20, 2017. 12. Powell ES, Smith-Taillie LP, Popkin BM. Added sugars intake across the distribution of US children and adult consumers: 1977 to 2012. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. 2016;116(10):1543-1550. 13. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Trends in beverage consumption among high school students, United States 2007 to 2015. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 2017;66(4):112-116. [https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6604a5.htm]. Resources: Get the Facts about Sugary Drinks (Alaska) [http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/PlayEveryDay/Pages/default.aspx] Get the Facts: Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Consumption (CDC) [https://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/data-statistics/sugar-sweetened-beverages-intake.html] Know Your Limit for Added Sugars (CDC) [https://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/data-statistics/know-your-limit-for-added-sugars.html]

More Resources and Links

Alaska and national goals may be found at the following sites:

Alaska health promotion resources may be found at the following site:

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Maps of health indicators for various subdivisions of Alaska may be found at the following site:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

For an on-line medical dictionary, click on this Dictionary link.

AK-IBIS Web Citation

Use and reproduction of the information published on this website are encouraged and may be done without permission. The following citation should accompany information from this website whenever it is used, reproduced, or published:

AK-IBIS Indicator Citation:
"[Indicator name]. Retrieved on [insert date] from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health (AK-IBIS) website: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/.

Example:
Diabetes Prevalence. Retrieved on March 25, 2016, from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health (AK-IBIS) website: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/.

Page Content Updated On 07/20/2018, Published on 11/15/2018
The information provided above is from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services' Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health (Ak-IBIS) web site (http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Fri, 06 December 2019 from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health web site: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov ".

Content updated: Thu, 15 Nov 2018 10:19:19 AKST
The information provided above is from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services' Center for Health Data and Statistics AK-IBIS web site (http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Fri, 06 December 2019 4:31:08 from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Center for Health Data and Statistics, Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health Web site: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov/ ".

Content updated: Thu, 15 Nov 2018 10:19:19 AKST