Complete Indicator Profile - Alcohol-Induced Mortality Rate (HA2020 Leading Health Indicator: 14)

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State of Alaska

Complete Indicator Profile of Alcohol-Induced Mortality Rate (HA2020 Leading Health Indicator: 14)

Definition

Alcohol-induced mortality rate is defined as the number of deaths attributed to alcohol per 100,000 population. The list of codes included in alcohol-induced causes was expanded in data years 2003 and 2006 to be more comprehensive. The following ICD-10 codes comprise the list of alcohol-induced codes: E24.4, F10, G31.2, G62.1, G72.1, I42.6, K29.2, K70, K85.2, K86.0, R78.0, X45, X65, and Y15.

Certain causes of death are, by definition due to alcohol consumption. These deaths are classified as being 100% alcohol-attributable and are reported in Alcohol-Related Disease Impact (ARDI) as having an alcohol-attributable fraction (AAF) of 1.00. The following chronic causes of death are listed as 100% alcohol-attributable in ARDI: alcoholic psychosis, alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence syndrome, alcohol polyneuropathy, degeneration of the nervous system due to alcohol use, alcoholic myopathy, alcohol cardiomyopathy, alcoholic gastritis, alcoholic liver disease, fetal alcohol syndrome, fetus and newborn affected by maternal use of alcohol, alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis. Three acute causes of death are 100% alcohol-attributable: alcohol poisoning, excessive blood alcohol level, and suicide by and exposure to alcohol.

Alcohol-induced deaths include fatalities from causes such as degeneration of the nervous system due to alcohol, alcoholic liver disease, gastritis, myopathy, pancreatitis, poisoning, and more . It does not include accidents, homicides, and other causes indirectly related to alcohol use.

Numerator

Number of deaths induced by alcohol.

Denominator

Mid-year resident population for the same calendar year, expressed as a rate per 100,000.

Why Is This Important?

Alcohol and substance abuse have a devastating impact on individuals, families and entire communities across Alaska. The effects of alcohol and other drug abuse include unintentional and intentional injuries, violence, high-risk sexual behaviors, cirrhosis, and alcohol poisoning. Alaska experiences a disparately high rate of alcohol induced mortality compared to the U.S. Alcohol and other drug use is common among adolescents and is a strong predictor of dependence in later life.

Healthy People Objective SA-20:

Decrease the number of deaths attributable to alcohol
U.S. Target: 71,681 deaths

Other Objectives

Healthy Alaskans 2020 Target: 15.3 per 100,000 population

Evidence-based Practices

As part of the Healthy Alaskans 2020 health improvement process, groups of Alaskan subject matter experts met over a period of months in a rigorous review process to identify and prioritize strategies to address the 25 health priorities. Public health partners around the state are aligning work around these approaches adapted to Alaska's unique needs. Below are the strategies identified for enhancing adolescent support systems.

Strategy 1:
Ensure there is access to a complete continuum of care throughout Alaska for substance abuse treatment, including for people with both mental health and substance abuse disorders.

Evidence Base:
SAMHSA recommends a modern addictions and mental health service system that includes prevention, treatment and recovery supports. This continuum of care comprises nine domains, including:
-Health Homes
-Prevention and Wellness Services
-Engagement Services
-Outpatient and Medication Assisted Treatment
-Community Supports and Recovery Services
-Intensive Support Services
-Other Living Supports
-Out of Home Residential Services
-Acute Intensive Services

Source:
Description of a Good and Modern Addictions and Mental Health Service System: http://beta.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/good_and_modern_4_18_2011_508.pdf

Strategy 2:
Promote environmental strategies to reduce alcohol consumption. Environmental strategies incorporate prevention efforts aimed at changing or influencing community conditions, standards, institutions, structures, systems and policies. Strategies that lead to long-term outcomes should be selected. Increasing fines for underage drinking, not selling cold, single-serving containers of beer in convenience stores and increasing access to treatment services by providing counselors who speak the local language are all examples of environmental strategies.

Evidence Base:
There is substantial evidence that environmental strategies are effective in preventing and reducing substance abuse. Increasing fines for underage drinking, not selling cold, single-serving containers of beer in convenience stores and increasing access to treatment services by providing counselors who speak the local language are all examples of environmental strategies.

Sources:
Community Trials Intervention to Reduce High-Risk Drinking: http://www.nrepp.samhsa.gov/ViewIntervention.aspx?id=9
Environmental Strategies: http://www.cadca.org/category/coalition-resourcestools/environmental-strategies
Environmental Strategies Selection Guide, Reference List, and Examples of Implementation Guidelines: http://captus.samhsa.gov/access-resources/environmental-strategies-selection-guidereference-list-and-examples-implementation-guidelines



Related Indicators

Related Relevant Population Characteristics Indicator Profiles:


Related Health Care System Factors Indicator Profiles:


Related Risk Factors Indicator Profiles:




Graphical Data Views

Alcohol-induced mortality rate per 100,000 population, all Alaskans, Alaska Natives, and U.S., 2001-2020

::chart - missing::

Alaska Comparisons Year Alcohol-induced mortality rate per 100,000
Record Count: 46
All Alaskans 2001 20.7
All Alaskans 2002 19.9
All Alaskans 2003 21.0
All Alaskans 2004 16.1
All Alaskans 2005 19.5
All Alaskans 2006 21.4
All Alaskans 2007 20.6
All Alaskans 2008 21.6
All Alaskans 2009 21.8
All Alaskans 2010 16.3
All Alaskans 2011 17.2
All Alaskans 2012 15.7
All Alaskans 2013 16.4
Alaska Natives 2001 67.7
Alaska Natives 2002 72.8
Alaska Natives 2003 66.6
Alaska Natives 2004 56.7
Alaska Natives 2005 62.5
Alaska Natives 2006 53.5
Alaska Natives 2007 71.7
Alaska Natives 2008 68.8
Alaska Natives 2009 63.5
Alaska Natives 2010 61.2
Alaska Natives 2011 58.0
Alaska Natives 2012 61.6
Alaska Natives 2013 52.8
U.S. 2001 7.0
U.S. 2002 6.9
U.S. 2003 7.0
U.S. 2004 7.0
U.S. 2005 7.0
U.S. 2006 7.0
U.S. 2007 7.2
U.S. 2008 7.4
U.S. 2009 7.4
U.S. 2010 7.6
U.S. 2011 7.7
U.S. 2012 8.0
Healthy Alaskans Goal 2013 15.3
Healthy Alaskans Goal 2014 15.3
Healthy Alaskans Goal 2015 15.3
Healthy Alaskans Goal 2016 15.3
Healthy Alaskans Goal 2017 15.3
Healthy Alaskans Goal 2018 15.3
Healthy Alaskans Goal 2019 15.3
Healthy Alaskans Goal 2020 15.3

Data Notes

Healthy Alaskans 2020 Target: 15.3 per 100,000 population

** Data Not Available

Causes of death attributable to alcohol-induced mortality include ICD-10 codes E24.4, Alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing's syndrome; F10, Mental and behavioral disorders due to alcohol use; G31.2, Degeneration of nervous system due to alcohol; G62.1, Alcoholic polyneuropathy; G72.1, Alcoholic myopathy; I42.6, Alcoholic cardiomyopathy; K29.2, Alcoholic gastritis; K70, Alcoholic liver disease; K86.0, Alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis; R78.0, Finding of alcohol in blood; X45, Accidental poisoning by and exposure to alcohol; X65, Intentional self-poisoning by and exposure to alcohol; and Y15, Poisoning by and exposure to alcohol, undetermined intent. Alcohol-induced causes exclude accidents, homicides, and other causes indirectly related to alcohol use. This category also excludes newborn deaths associated with maternal alcohol use.[1]

1. National Vital Statistics Reports, Volume 56, Number 10, p. 109. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr56/nvsr56_10.pdf.   2011 U.S. value of 7.6 is preliminary.

Data Sources

  • Alaska Bureau of Vital Statistics, Division of Public Health, Department of Health and Social Services
  • National Vital Statistics System, National Center for Health Statistics, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


More Resources and Links

Alaska and national goals may be found at the following sites:

Maps of health indicators for various subdivisions of Alaska may be found at the following site:

Evidence-based community health improvement ideas and interventions may be found at the following sites:

Additional indicator data by state and county may be found on these Websites:

Medical literature can be queried at the PubMed website.

For an on-line medical dictionary, click on this Dictionary link.

Page Content Updated On 01/14/2015, Published on 01/15/2015
The information provided above is from the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services' Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health (Ak-IBIS) web site (http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: "Retrieved Sun, 29 March 2015 23:03:29 from Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Center for Health Data and Statistics, Alaska Indicator-Based Information System for Public Health web site: http://ibis.dhss.alaska.gov".

Content updated: Thu, 15 Jan 2015 10:50:56 AKST